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World Summit for Social Development
Copenhagen, 6 - 12 March 1995

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Adoptions and Organizational Matters:

II. Attendance and Organization of Work

A. Date and place of the Summit
B. Attendance
C. Opening of the Summit and election of the President
D. Messages from heads of State
E. Adoption of the rules of procedure
F. Adoption of the agenda
G. Election of officers other than the President
H. Organization of work, including establishment of the Main Committee 
I. Accreditation of intergovernmental organizations
J. Accreditation of non-governmental organizations
K. Appointment of the members of the Credentials Committee

III. General Exchange of Views

IV. Report of the Main Committee

V. Adoption of the Copenhagen Declaration on Social development and the Programme of Action of the World Sumit for Social Development

VI. Report orf the Credentials Committee

VII. Meeting of Heads of State or Government

VIII. Adoption of the Report of the Summit

IX. Closure of the Summit

Annexes
I. List of Documents
II. Opening Statements
III. Closing Statements

ATTENDANCE AND ORGANIZATION OF WORK    [ Up ]

A. Date and place of the Summit

1. The World Summit for Social Development was held at Copenhagen from 6 to 12 March 1995, in conformity with General Assembly resolution 47/92 of 16 December 1992. During that period, the Summit held 14 plenary meetings.

B. Attendance

2. The following States and regional economic integration organization were represented at the Summit:
Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad Chile China Colombia Comoros Congo Cook Islands Costa Rica Co^te d'Ivoire Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic People's Republic of Korea Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia European Community Fiji Finland France Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Greece Grenada Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Holy See Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia (Federated States of) Monaco Mongolia Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nepal Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Qatar Republic of Korea Republic of Moldova Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands South Africa Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Tajikistan Thailand The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland United Republic of Tanzania United States of America Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Yemen Zaire Zambia Zimbabwe

3. The observer for Palestine attended the Summit.

4. The following associate members of the regional commissions were represented by observers: Macau Netherlands Antilles

5. The secretariats of the following regional commissions were represented: Economic Commission for Africa Economic Commission for Europe Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia

6. The following United Nations bodies and programmes were represented: United Nations Children's Fund United Nations Conference on Trade and Development United Nations Development Fund for Women United Nations Development Programme United Nations Environment Programme United Nations Population Fund United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East United Nations University World Food Programme United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (Habitat) United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Office of the United Nations International Drug Control Programme International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women United Nations Research Institute for Social Development

7. The following specialized agencies were represented:
International Labour Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization World Health Organization World Bank International Monetary Fund World Meteorological Organization World Intellectual Property Organization International Fund for Agricultural Development United Nations Industrial Development Organization

8. The following intergovernmental organizations were accredited to participate in the Summit:
African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States African Development Bank African Society for Humanitarian Aid and Development Sudan Andean Parliament Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development Asian-African Legal Consultative Committee Asian and Pacific Development Centre Asian Development Bank Asian Forum of Parliamentarians on Population and Development Association of South-East Asian Nations Commonwealth of Independent States Commonwealth Secretariat Council of Europe Economic Affairs Secretariat Gulf Cooperation Council Inter-American Development Bank International Committee of the Red Cross International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies International Food Policy Research Institute International Organization for Migration Islamic Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Latin American Economic System Latin American Parliament League of Arab States Nordic Council Secretariat of the Presidium Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Organization of African Unity Organization of American States Organization of Eastern Caribbean States Organization of the Islamic Conference South Pacific Commission

9. A large number of non-governmental organizations attended the Summit. The list of non-governmental organizations participating is given in documents A/CONF.166/PC/11 and Add.1-3 and A/CONF.166/4.

C. Opening of the Summit and election of the President    [ Up ]

10. The Summit was declared open by the Secretary-General of the United Nations. The Secretary-General then addressed the Summit.

11. At the 1st plenary meeting, on 6 March, the Summit elected, by acclamation, as President of the Summit, His Excellency Mr. Poul Nyrup Rasmussen, Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Denmark. The President of the Summit made a statement.

D. Messages from heads of State

12. The Summit received a message wishing it success from His Excellency Mr. Jose' Eduardo dos Santos, President of the Republic of Angola.

E. Adoption of the rules of procedure

13. At the 1st plenary meeting, on 6 March, the Summit adopted the provisional rules of procedure (A/CONF.166/2) as recommended by the Preparatory Committee for the Summit and approved by the General Assembly in its decision 49/446 of 23 December 1994.

F. Adoption of the agenda

14. At the 1st plenary meeting, on 6 March, the Summit adopted as its agenda the provisional agenda (A/CONF.166/1) recommended by the Preparatory Committee in its decision 3/3. The agenda as adopted was as follows:

1. Inaugural ceremony.
2. Election of the President.
3. Adoption of the rules of procedure.
4. Adoption of the agenda and other organizational matters.
5. Election of officers other than the President.
6. Organization of work, including establishment of the Main Committee.
7. Credentials of representatives to the Summit:
(a) Appointment of the members of the Credentials Committee;
(b) Report of the Credentials Committee.
8. General exchange of views.
9. Meeting of heads of State or Government.
10. Declaration and Programme of Action of the World Summit for Social Development.
11. Adoption of the report of the Summit.

G. Election of officers other than the President

15. At the 1st and 7th plenary meetings, on 6 and 9 March, the Summit elected Vice-Presidents from the following regional groups:
African States (7 Vice-Presidents): Algeria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Guinea-Bissau, Sudan and Zimbabwe; Asian States (6 Vice-Presidents): China, India, Indonesia, Philippines, Qatar and Republic of Korea; Eastern European States (3 Vice-Presidents): Latvia, Slovakia and Ukraine; Latin American and Caribbean States (5 Vice-Presidents): Belize, Chile, Cuba, Panama and Paraguay; Western European and other States (6 Vice-Presidents): Andorra, Australia, Canada, Germany, Portugal and Sweden.

16. At the 1st plenary meeting, on 6 March, the Summit elected, by acclamation, an ex officio Vice-President from the host country, His Excellency Mr. Poul Nielson, Minister for Development Cooperation of the Kingdom of Denmark.

17. At the same meeting, the Summit elected Mr. Sadok Rabah (Tunisia), Rapporteur-General of the Summit.

18. Also at the 1st plenary meeting, the Summit elected Mr. Juan Somavia (Chile), Chairman of the Main Committee.

H. Organization of work, including establishment of the Main Committee

19. At the 1st plenary meeting, on 6 March, the Summit approved the organization of work as set out in document A/CONF.166/3 and orally amended. It decided to allocate agenda item 10 (Declaration and Programme of Action of the World Summit for Social Development) to the Main Committee.

I. Accreditation of intergovernmental organizations

20. At the 1st plenary meeting, on 6 March, the Summit approved the accreditation of the intergovernmental organizations listed in document A/CONF.166/6.

J. Accreditation of non-governmental organizations

21. At the 1st plenary meeting, on 6 March, the Summit approved the accreditation of the non-governmental organizations listed in document A/CONF.166/4.

K. Appointment of the members of the Credentials Committee

22. At the 1st plenary meeting, on 6 March, in conformity with rule 4 of the rules of procedure of the Summit (A/CONF.166/2), the Summit established a Credentials Committee composed of China, Fiji, Honduras, Namibia, Portugal, the Russian Federation, Suriname, Togo and the United States of America, on the understanding that if one of those States did not participate in the Summit, it would be replaced by another State from the same regional group.

Chapter III    [ Up ]

GENERAL EXCHANGE OF VIEWS

1. The Summit held a general exchange of views at the 1st to 10th meetings, from 6 to 10 March 1995. Representatives of States, specialized agencies, United Nations bodies, programmes and offices, intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organizations and observers of associate members of the regional commissions addressed the Summit. All speakers expressed their appreciation of the efforts made by the host Government and the secretariat in preparing for the Summit.

2. At the 1st meeting, on 6 March, statements were made by the representatives of the Philippines (on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the Group of 77), France (on behalf of the European Union), Chile, Malaysia, Venezuela, Slovakia, Mali and Ukraine.

3. At the 2nd meeting, on 6 March, statements were made by the representatives of Norway, Kuwait, Jamaica, Italy, Germany, the Republic of Korea, Barbados, Seychelles, Azerbaijan, Bolivia and Papua New Guinea.

4. At the same meeting, the Director-General of the World Health Organization made a statement. The Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme made a statement. The representative of the Islamic Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, an intergovernmental organization, made a statement. Statements were also made by the representatives of the following non-governmental organizations: World Council of Churches, Baha'i International Community and South Asia Caucus. Her Royal Highness Princess Basma Bint Talal of Jordan introduced the report of the forty-seventh annual Department of Public Information/Non-Governmental Organizations Conference, held on 20-22 September 1994.

5. At the 3rd meeting, on 7 March, statements were made by the representatives of Mexico, Burkina Faso, the Syrian Arab Republic, Algeria, Romania, Guyana, Kenya, Ethiopia, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the Marshall Islands, Mongolia, the Lao People's Democratic Republic, the Gambia, Tunisia and China.

6. At the same meeting, statements were made by the Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund and the Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The representative of the Commission on Global Governance, a non-governmental organization, also made a statement.

7. At the 4th meeting, on 7 March, statements were made by the representatives of Swaziland, the United Arab Emirates, Austria, India, Benin, the Holy See, the United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Switzerland, Malawi, Sri Lanka, Guinea, Peru, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Nepal and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

8. At the same meeting, the President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development made a statement. Statements were made by the Executive Director of the United Nations International Drug Control Programme, the Executive Director of the World Food Programme, the Deputy Executive Director of the United Nations Children's Fund and the Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme. Statements were made by the representatives of the following intergovernmental organizations: International Committee of the Red Cross, International Organization for Migration and Latin American Parliament. Statements were also made by the representatives of the following non-governmental organizations: International Planned Parenthood Federation, Me'decins du Monde, International Council on Social Welfare, International Federation of Agricultural Producers, International Union of Local Authorities and World Assembly of Youth.

9. At the 5th meeting, on 8 March, statements were made by the First Lady of Panama and by the representatives of Pakistan, Spain, Ghana, Namibia, Senegal, Haiti, the Bahamas, Slovenia, the Niger, the United States of America, Botswana, Belize and the Russian Federation.

10. At the same meeting, the representative of the Women's Environment and Development Organization, a non-governmental organization, made a statement.

11. At the 6th meeting, on 8 March, statements were made by His Highness Prince Sisowath Sirirath of Cambodia and by the representatives of Liechtenstein, Brazil, Guinea-Bissau, Malta, Antigua and Barbuda, Iceland, Cameroon, Jordan, the Sudan, Ireland, Sierra Leone, Burundi, Ecuador, Nigeria, Rwanda, the Congo and Chad.

12. At the same meeting, statements were made by the Secretary-General of the Fourth World Conference on Women, the Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund, the Director of the United Nations Development Fund for Women, the President of the Board of Trustees of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women, the Executive Coordinator of the United Nations Volunteers and the Director of the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development. Statements were made by the representatives of the following intergovernmental organizations: Organization of African Unity, Asian Development Bank and International Food Policy Research Institute. Statements were also made by the representatives of the following non-governmental organizations: Inter-Parliamentary Union, Women's Caucus, Union Nationale de la Femme Tunisienne, World Movement of Mothers, National Union of Working Women, Soroptimist International, International Council of Women, International Center for Economic Growth and World Blind Union.

13. At the 7th meeting, on 9 March, statements were made by the representatives of Colombia, Belarus, Poland, Finland, Turkey, Canada, Andorra, Portugal, Bulgaria, Uganda, Saudi Arabia, Estonia, Cyprus and Gabon.

14. At the same meeting, statements were made by the Directors-General of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the International Labour Organization and the United Nations Industrial Development Organization. The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights made a statement. The representative of the European Commission, an intergovernmental organization, also made a statement.

15. At the 8th meeting, on 9 March, statements were made by the representatives of Mauritius, the Netherlands, Suriname, Guatemala, Greece, Djibouti, Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Mozambique, Lesotho, Brunei Darussalam, Myanmar, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Nicaragua, Niue and the Cook Islands.

16. At the same meeting, statements were made by the Secretary-General of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II), the Rector of the United Nations University and the Officer-in-Charge of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. Statements were made by the representatives of the following intergovernmental organizations: Agency for Cultural and Technical Cooperation and Nordic Council. Statements were also made by the representatives of the following non-governmental organizations: International Chamber of Commerce, International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, Rotary International, Small Farmers, Producers and Micro-entrepreneurs Caucus, World Confederation of Labour, Independent Commission for Population and Quality of Life, Values Caucus, African Caucus, International Movement ATD Fourth World and Bonn International Centre for Conversion. The President of the Conference of Non-Governmental Organizations in Consultative Status with the Economic and Social Council and the representative of the NGO Committee on Ageing made statements.

17. At the 9th meeting, on 10 March, statements were made by the representatives of Viet Nam, Sweden, Vanuatu, Denmark, Singapore, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Trinidad and Tobago, Japan, Israel, Latvia, Croatia, Belgium, Lithuania and Uruguay. The observer for Palestine made a statement.

18. At the same meeting, the Managing Director of the World Bank made a statement. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees made a statement. The representative of the Commonwealth Secretariat, an intergovernmental organization, made a statement. The representative of the Disability Caucus, a non-governmental organization, made a statement.

19. At the 10th meeting, on 10 March, statements were made by the representatives of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Fiji, Thailand, Egypt, Angola, Cuba, Hungary, Lebanon, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Qatar, Iraq, Argentina, Mauritania, Saint Lucia, Morocco, Georgia, the Central African Republic and the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya. The observer for Macau made a statement.

20. At the same meeting, the representative of the World Meteorological Organization made a statement. Statements were made by the following intergovernmental organizations: Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Inter-American Development Bank, Council of Europe, League of Arab States and International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. The following non-governmental organizations also made statements: Business Association for the World Social Summit, Copenhagen Alternative Declaration, Cousteau Society, Development Caucus, Latin American Caucus, Rights of the Child Caucus, Third World Network and Eurostep, People's Alliance of Social Development and Center of Concern.

Chapter IV    [ Up ]

REPORT OF THE MAIN COMMITTEE

1. The Main Committee considered agenda item 10 (Declaration and Programme of Action of the World Summit for Social Development) at its 1st to 5th meetings, on 6, 7, 9 and 10 March 1995. It also held a number of informal meetings.

2. The Main Committee had before it a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the draft declaration and draft programme of action of the World Summit for Social Development (A/CONF.166/L.1 and Corr.1 and 2) and a note by the Secretariat transmitting additional proposals for the draft declaration and draft programme of action (A/CONF.166/L.2).

3. The Chairman of the Main Committee was Juan Somavia (Chile), who was elected by acclamation at the 1st plenary meeting of the Summit.

4. The Main Committee, at the 1st meeting, on 6 March, elected by acclamation the following States as Vice-Chairmen: Australia, Cameroon, India, Indonesia, Latvia, Mexico, Netherlands, Poland, Zimbabwe and Denmark (ex officio).

5. Also at the 1st meeting, the Main Committee established a Working Group, chaired by Mr. Prakash Shah (India). The Working Group held a number of meetings.

Consideration of the draft declaration and draft programme of action

6. At the 2nd to 5th meetings, on 6, 7, 9 and 10 March, the Main Committee considered the draft declaration and draft programme of action and the amendments thereto (see A/CONF.166/L.3/Add.1, Add.1/Corr.1-3, Add.2 and 3, Add.3/Corr.1, Add.4, Add.4/Corr.1, Add.5-7 and Add.7/Corr.1).

7. At the 4th meeting, on 9 March, the Main Committee approved a new commitment for the draft declaration, to be included in the declaration as commitment 6, and recommended it to the Summit for adoption (see A/CONF.166/L.3/Add.2). Statements were made by the representatives of Tunisia, Indonesia, the Holy See, Brazil, India, the United States of America, Egypt, Canada, Benin, Switzerland, Uganda, Guatemala, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Algeria, Malta, France (on behalf of the European Union), the Sudan, Fiji, Pakistan and the Philippines (on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the Group of 77 and China). The Vice- Chairman of the Committee, Mr. Shah (India), also made a statement.

8. The Main Committee then considered the draft declaration as a whole. The Vice-Chairman of the Committee, Mr. Richard Butler (Australia), informed the Committee of the progress made during informal consultations. Statements were made by the representatives of the United State of America, Egypt, the Russian Federation, the Philippines (on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the Group of 77 and China) and Cuba.

9. At the same meeting, the Main Committee considered chapter I of the draft programme of action. The Vice-Chairman of the Committee, Mr. Butler (Australia), informed the Committee of the progress made during informal consultations. Statements were made by the representatives of the United States of America, Egypt, Pakistan, the Sudan, Benin, China, Bangladesh, Canada, France (on behalf of the European Union), the Holy See, Azerbaijan and Belize.

10. Also at the 4th meeting, the Main Committee approved chapter II of the draft programme of action and recommended it to the Summit for adoption (see A/CONF.166/L.3/Add.4 and Corr.1). Statements were made by the representatives of Saudi Arabia, Canada, the United States of America, Pakistan, Guatemala, the United Arab Emirates, the Sudan, Norway, Mongolia, Zambia, Jamaica, Australia, Malta, Bangladesh, the Holy See, the Islamic Republic of Iran and Egypt.

11. At the same meeting, the Main Committee approved chapter III of the draft programme of action and recommended it to the Summit for adoption (see A/CONF.166/L.3/Add.5). Statements were made by the representatives of the United States of America and Australia.

12. At the same meeting, the Main Committee approved chapter IV of the draft programme of action and recommended it to the Summit for adoption (see A/CONF.166/L.3/Add.6). Statements were made by the representatives of the Philippines (on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the Group of 77 and China), Canada and the Holy See.

13. Also at the 4th meeting, the Main Committee considered chapter V of the draft programme of action. The representative of Malaysia informed the Committee of the progress made during informal consultations. Statements were made by the representatives of Ukraine, Egypt, the United States of America, Benin, Algeria and Indonesia.

14. At the 5th meeting, on 10 March, the Main Committee approved the draft declaration (see A/CONF.166/L.3/Add.1 and Corr.1-3) and chapters I and V of the draft programme of action (see A/CONF.166/L.3/Add.3 and Corr.1 and A/CONF.166/L.3/Add.7 and Corr.1). It deleted former paragraph 88 (c) of the draft programme of action, concerning the establishment of an international fund for social development, on the understanding that the issue would be considered by the Economic and Social Council at its substantive session of 1995 in the context of the discussion of the World Summit for Social Development.

15. Statements were made by the representatives of the Philippines (on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the Group of 77 and China), the United States of America, Azerbaijan, Egypt, India, Iraq, Tunisia, Guatemala, Kuwait, Belize, Saudi Arabia, Costa Rica, Pakistan, Ecuador, Argentina, Malta, Peru, the Holy See, the Sudan and Jordan.

16. At the same meeting, the Chairman of the Main Committee and the Under- Secretary-General for Policy Coordination and Sustainable Development made statements.

17. The following requested that their reservations or comments be placed on record:

(a) The representative of Egypt expressed a reservation on any reference counter to the laws and Constitution of Egypt and wished to see specific commitments from donor countries on assistance to social development and debt alleviation;

(b) The representatives of Iraq and Kuwait stated that the thrust of commitment 9 of the Copenhagen Declaration should be on social development;

(c) The representative of Peru stated that nothing in the Copenhagen Declaration or the Programme of Action should be contrary to the right to life;

(d) The representative of the Philippines, on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the Group of 77, stated that, owing to inequalities between the developing countries and countries with economies in transition, the two should not be treated on an equal basis. He expressed a reservation on paragraph 6 of the Copenhagen Declaration;

(e) The representative of the Sudan expressed a reservation on any paragraphs that contradict Islamic law (Sharia);

(f) The representative of Ukraine expressed a preference for alternative wording at the end of paragraph 89 (b).

Chapter V    [ Up ]

ADOPTION OF THE COPENHAGEN DECLARATION ON SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND THE PROGRAMME OF ACTION OF THE WORLD SUMMIT FOR SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

1. At the 14th plenary meeting, on 12 March, the representative of the Philippines, on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the Group of 77 and China, introduced and orally revised a draft resolution (A/CONF.166/L.5) entitled "Declaration and Programme of Action of the World Summit for Social Development".

2. At the same meeting, the Summit adopted the draft resolution as revised (for the text, see chap. I, resolution 1).

3. Before the adoption of the draft resolution, statements were made by the representatives of Azerbaijan, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Qatar, the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, the United Arab Emirates and the Holy See.

Reservations on the Copenhagen Declaration and the Programme of Action

4. The representatives of a number of countries made statements which they requested the secretariat of the Summit to place on record. Those statements are set out below.

5. The representative of Argentina submitted the following written statement: The Argentine Republic wishes to place on record the following reservations with regard to the terms "reproductive health" and "forms of family", contained in the text of the Declaration and Programme of Action of the World Summit for Social Development held in Copenhagen, adopted at a plenary meeting of the Summit:

Reproductive health: The Argentine Republic cannot accept the idea that reproductive health should include abortion, either as a service or as a method of birth control. This reservation, which is based on the universal nature of the right to life, extends to all references of this kind.

Forms of family: The Argentine Republic declares that it accepts those paragraphs that refer to forms of family on the understanding that the references in question do not imply any change in the meaning of the origin and foundation of the family, which is the union of a man and a woman from which children are derived.

6. The representative of Azerbaijan submitted the following written statement: The delegation of Azerbaijan welcomes the adoption of the Declaration and Programme of Action.

Paragraph 26 (k) of the Declaration is based on article 2 of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, adopted at the World Conference on Human Rights. However, this paragraph does not completely reflect the wording of the Vienna Declaration.

In fact, section I, paragraph 2, of the Vienna Declaration states: "Taking into account the particular situation of peoples under colonial or other forms of alien domination or foreign occupation ...".

The wording of paragraph 26 (k) of the Declaration is different from that of the Vienna Declaration. Instead of stating: "Taking into account the particular situation of peoples ...", it states: "... in particular of peoples ...". We would prefer that paragraph 26 (k) reflect the exact wording of the Vienna Declaration.

As far as paragraph 15 (e) of the Programme of Action of the Summit is concerned, there is no reference at all to the Vienna Declaration.

For this reason, my delegation would like to reserve its position on paragraph 15 (e) and ask the secretariat to duly reflect this reservation in the records of the Summit.

7. The representative of Costa Rica submitted the following written statement: Costa Rica respectfully requests the President of the World Summit for Social Development, held in Copenhagen, to include in the report Costa Rica's reservation concerning paragraph 21 of the Declaration and the twelfth point in paragraph 70 in chapter IV, on social integration. Even though Costa Rica recognizes the existence of conflicts and differences between nations and peoples and between social groups, it considers that such conflicts should be resolved through negotiation, dialogue and efforts to achieve a consensus, and that the resources spent on arms would be better invested in the social development of peoples.

8. The representative of Guatemala submitted the following written statement: My delegation requests that the following statement be included in the final report of the World Summit for Social Development. For reasons that concern my country, Guatemala wishes to make an express reservation with regard to all uses of the term "territorial integrity" or of any other term which might have implications with respect to the territorial dispute in which Guatemala is involved and which my Government is seeking to resolve in accordance with the principle of the peaceful settlement of disputes between States.

The delegation of Guatemala also has reservations with respect to all such topics as "reproductive health", "family planning" and "health education" which, in one way or another, might be contrary to the Constitution of our country, our laws or the religious, ethical and cultural values upheld by Guatemala.

My delegation also wishes to express the reservations of Guatemala with respect to anything that might in any way be prejudicial to the commitments and positions of Guatemala set forth in the following documents:

The Alliance for the Sustainable Development of Central America, adopted at the Central American environment summit meeting for sustainable development held in Managua, Nicaragua, on 12 October 1994, and circulated as an official document of the General Assembly and the Security Council (A/49/580-S/1994/1217, annex I), dated 27 October 1994,

The Tegucigalpa International Declaration on Peace and Development in Central America adopted by the Central American Presidents at the International Conference on Peace and Development in Central America, held in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on 24 and 25 October 1994, and circulated as an official document of the General Assembly and the Security Council (A/49/639-S/1994/1247, annex I), dated 4 November 1994,

The reservations submitted by Guatemala to the Programme of Action of the Conference on Population and Development, held in Cairo on 13 September 1994, and the documents referred to in the aforementioned reservations, in particular:

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the constitutional principles and provisions embodied in the domestic law of the Republic of Guatemala.

9. The representative of the Holy See submitted the following written statement: The Holy See, in conformity with its nature and particular mission, in joining the consensus at the World Summit for Social Development, held in Copenhagen from 6 to 12 March 1995, wishes to express its understanding of some concepts used in the documents of the Summit.

1. The Holy See reaffirms the reservation it expressed at the conclusion of the International Conference on Population and Development, held in Cairo from 5 to 13 September 1994, which is included in the report of that Conference, concerning the interpretation given to the term "reproductive health". In particular, the Holy See reiterates that it does not consider abortion or access to abortion as a dimension of reproductive health or reproductive health services.

2. The Holy See's joining the consensus on the term "family planning" should in no way be interpreted as constituting a change in its well- known position concerning those family planning methods that the Catholic Church considers morally unacceptable or concerning family planning services that do not respect the liberty of spouses, human dignity and the human rights of those concerned.

3. The Holy See, in line with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, stresses that the family is the basic unit of society and is based on marriage as an equal partnership between husband and wife.

4. With reference to all international agreements and instruments mentioned in the documents of the Summit, the Holy See reserves its position in a manner consistent with its acceptance or non-acceptance of them or of any expression found in them.

5. Nothing that the Holy See has done in this consensus process should be understood or interpreted as an endorsement of concepts that it cannot support for moral reasons. Especially, nothing is to be understood to imply that the Holy See endorses abortion or has in any way changed its moral position concerning abortion or on contraceptives, sterilization or the use of condoms in HIV/AIDS prevention programmes.

The Holy See asks that these reservations be included in the report of the Summit.

10. The representative of Iraq submitted the following written statement: Although the delegation of Iraq joined the other delegations in agreeing on the Declaration and the Programme of Action, it is important to point out that this document neglected to deal with a very important question that has negative effects on the process of social development, that is, the "brain drain". It is well known that some of the industrialized countries are enacting legislation and inciting qualified third world persons to emigrate from their home countries. This process has had very adverse effects on the development of the affected third world countries.

It is unfortunate that the Summit did not pay any attention to this question. The delegation of Iraq would, therefore, like to put this question on record.

The pressures that were applied by some Western countries have also resulted in the Summit not dealing with the serious effects of economic sanctions on the social development of targeted countries that belong to the third world, which are already suffering from social backwardness. Here, also, the delegation of Iraq would like to put on record this defect in the final document of the Summit.

11. The representative of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya submitted the following written statement:

The delegation of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya has expressed certain observations during previous meetings namely:

"What has been ordained to us by God cannot be changed by man. What has been particularly textually defined by the Holy Koran cannot be countered."

The delegation of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya expresses reservations about what has been stated in the Declaration and the Programme of Action that counters Islamic Sharia.

12. The representative of Malta submitted the following written statement: The delegation of Malta reserves its position on the use of the term "reproductive health" in the Declaration and the Programme of Action.

The interpretation given by Malta to this term is consistent with its national legislation which considers the termination of pregnancy through procedures of induced abortion as illegal.

The delegation of Malta requests that this reservation be included in the final document of the World Summit for Social Development.

13. The representative of Oman submitted the following written statement: The Sultanate of Oman adopts the Declaration and Programme of Action of the World Summit for Social Development, provided they are not in conflict with the requirements of the Islamic religion and our national laws.

14. The representative of Qatar submitted the following written statement: The delegation of the State of Qatar would like to make reservations on any part or paragraph of the Declaration and Programme of Action adopted by the Summit, in case of any contradictions with Islamic principles (Sharia), our moral values or our national traditions.

The delegation of Qatar requests that its reservations be included in the final report of the Summit.

15. The representative of Saudi Arabia submitted the following written statement: The delegation of Saudi Arabia would like to express its reservations on any part of the Declaration or Programme of Action of the Summit that does not conform to, is not in line with or contradicts Islamic law (Sharia) or our values and traditions.

We would not be obliged to implement and will not commit ourselves to implementing any such part.

The delegation of Saudi Arabia requests that its reservations be included in the final report of the Summit.

16. The representative of the United Arab Emirates submitted the following written statement: The delegation of the United Arab Emirates would like to express its reservations on any part or paragraph in the Declaration or Programme of Action of the Summit that contradicts in any way Islamic law (Sharia) or does not conform to our ethical values and traditions. It should be noted that we have expressed our reservations during the discussion in the Main Committee.

The delegation of the United Arab Emirates requests that its reservations be included in the final report of the Summit.

17. The representative of the United States of America submitted the following written statement: Declaration, paragraph 16 (d), and Programme of Action, paragraph 10 (c)

As recognized in paragraph 10 of the Declaration, Governments reaffirm and are guided by the principles of the Charter of the United Nations and by the decisions of, inter alia, the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, held at Rio de Janeiro in 1992. We understand and accept the references to consumption in both paragraph 16 (d) of the Declaration and paragraph 10 (c) of the Programme of Action in the context of the full reference from paragraph 4.3 of Agenda 21, as follows:

Poverty and environmental degradation are closely interrelated. While poverty results in certain kinds of environmental stress, the major cause of the continued deterioration of the global environment is the unsustainable pattern of consumption and production, particularly in industrialized countries, which is a matter of grave concern, aggravating poverty and imbalances.

Declaration, paragraph 27: We understand and accept that the goals referred to in paragraph 27 refer to achieving social development in general and to creating a suitable framework of action in particular.

Commitment 9 (l) and Programme of Action, paragraphs 11 (h) and 88 (b): The United States reiterates that, with respect to commitment 9 (l) and paragraphs 11 (h) and 88 (b) of the Programme of Action, it is not one of the countries that have accepted an "agreed target" for official development assistance or have made a commitment to fulfil such a target. We believe that national Governments, not international donors, must have primary responsibility for their country's development. Targets detract from the more important issues of the effectiveness and quality of aid and the policies of the recipient country. The United States has traditionally been one of the largest aid donors in volume terms and will continue to work with developing countries to provide aid in support of their efforts.

In addition, the United States understands and accepts the reference in commitment 9 (l) to increasing the share of official development assistance for social development programmes to apply to only those countries that have accepted the target.

Commitment 9 (m): The United States understands the word "resources" in commitment 9 (m) to include technical and other non-financial forms of assistance, and accepts the commitment on that basis. The United States will strive to increase resources for the United States Food for Peace Program and will continue to provide resources for major refugee relief and logistic activities. The United States does not accept an interpretation of commitment 9 (m) that would commit States to provide only financial assistance.

Commitment 9 (s): The United States understands commitment 9 (s) to reiterate, as stated in General Assembly resolution 47/199, that there is a need for a substantial increase in resources for operational activities from all available sources for development and accepts the commitment on that basis. The United States understands the word "resources" to include technical and other non-financial forms of assistance and, in the spirit of commitment 9 (s) and General Assembly resolution 47/199, will seek to increase such resources from governmental and other sources in support of United Nations development efforts.

Programme of Action, paragraph 54 (b): The United States understands the intention of the inclusion of "equal remuneration for men and women for work of equal value" to be to promote pay equity between men and women and accepts the recommendation on that basis. The United States implements it by observing the principle of "equal pay for equal work".

Programme of Action, paragraph 83 (b): The United States understands and accepts the reference in paragraph 83 (b) of the Programme of Action to social development as primarily the responsibility of Governments to refer to Governments' responsibility to create an environment that includes the promotion and protection of all human rights and fundamental freedoms, thereby allowing each person to reach his or her full human potential.

Terminology: The United States understands and accepts that paragraph 28 of the Declaration and paragraphs 2 and 3 of the Programme of Action confirm that the Programme of Action, like the Declaration, is not legally binding and that it consists of recommendations concerning how States can and should promote social development. Accordingly, the United States understands and accepts that the words "requires" and "required" as used in the Declaration and in the Programme of Action suggest practical measures to help achieve social development and do not alter the status of the documents or the recommendations contained therein.

Reservation

Commitment 7 (e) and Programme of Action, paragraph 11 (h): As the United States stated several times during the World Summit for Social Development and the preparations for it, owing to domestic funding constraints it cannot agree to increase official development assistance, as called for by commitment 7 (e) and as recommended in paragraph 11 (h) of the Programme of Action. Accordingly, the United States wishes to express its reservations on commitment 7 (e) and on paragraph 11 (h) of the Programme of Action. The United States remains none the less committed to working to accelerate the development of Africa and the least developed countries.

Chapter VI    [ Up ]

REPORT OF THE CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE

1. At the 1st plenary meeting, on 6 March 1995, the World Summit for Social Development, in accordance with rule 4 of its rules of procedure, appointed a Credentials Committee, based on that of the Credentials Committee of the General Assembly of the United Nations at its forty-ninth session, consisting of the following nine members: China, Fiji, Honduras, Namibia, Portugal, Russian Federation, Suriname, Togo and United States of America.

2. The Credentials Committee held one meeting, on 9 March 1995.

3. Mr. Pedro Catarino (Portugal) was unanimously elected Chairman of the Committee.

4. The Committee had before it a memorandum by the Secretary-General dated 8 March 1995 on the status of credentials of representatives participating in the Summit. Additional information on credentials received by the Secretary-General after the issuance of the memorandum was provided to the Committee by its Secretary.

5. The Chairman proposed that the Committee accept the credentials of all the representatives mentioned in the memorandum by the Secretary-General, on the understanding that formal credentials for representatives referred to in paragraph 2 of the Secretary-General's memorandum would be communicated to the Secretary-General as soon as possible. The following draft resolution was proposed by the Chairman for adoption by the Committee:

The Credentials Committee,

Having examined the credentials of the representatives to the World Summit for Social Development referred to in the memorandum by the Secretary-General dated 8 March 1995,

Accepts the credentials of the representatives concerned.

6. The draft resolution was adopted by the Committee without a vote.

7. Subsequently, on the proposal of the Chairman, the Committee agreed to recommend to the Summit the adoption of a draft resolution approving the report of the Credentials Committee.

Action taken by the Summit

8. At the 10th plenary meeting, on 10 March 1995, the Summit considered the report of the Credentials Committee (A/CONF.166/7).

9. The Summit adopted the draft resolution recommended by the Committee in its report (for the text, see chap. I, resolution 3). The States and regional economic integration organization that participated in the Summit are listed in chapter II, paragraph 2.

Chapter VII    [ Up ]

MEETING OF HEADS OF STATE OR GOVERNMENT

The meeting of heads of State or Government took place on 11 and 12 March 1995. The following 134 heads of State or Government or their personal representatives made statements:

H.E. Mr. Poul Nyrup Rasmussen Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Denmark and President of the Summit , H.E. Sr. Eduardo Frei Ruiz Tagle President of the Republic of Chile , H.E. President Soeharto Republic of Indonesia , H.E. Sardar Farooq Ahmad Khan Leghari President of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan , H.E. Mr. Li Peng Premier of the State Council of the People's Republic of China , H.E. Mr. P. V. Narasimha Rao Prime Minister of the Republic of India , H.E. Mr. Franz Vranitzky Federal Chancellor of the Republic of Austria , H.E. Mr. Tomiichi Murayama Prime Minister of Japan , H.E. Mr. Ingvar Carlsson Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Sweden , H.E. Mr. Leonid D. Kuchma President of Ukraine , H.E. Sr. Felipe Gonzalez Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Spain , H.E. M. Franc'ois Mitterrand President of the French Republic , H.E. Mr. Willem Kok Prime Minister of the Kingdom of the Netherlands , H.E. Mr. Robert G. Mugabe President of the Republic of Zimbabwe , H.E. Mr. Kim Young Sam President of the Republic of Korea , H.E. Mr. Su"leyman Demirel President of the Republic of Turkey , H.E. Mr. Sam Nujoma President of the Republic of Namibia , H.E. M. Blaise Compaore President of Burkina Faso , H.E. Sr. Marc Forne' Molne' Head of Government of the Principality of Andorra , H.E. Flt. Lt. (Rtd.) Jerry John Rawlings President of the Republic of Ghana , H.E. Mr. Lamberto Dini President of the Council of Ministers of the Italian Republic, H.E. Dr. Cheddi B. Jagan President of the Republic of Guyana , H.E. Mr. Martti Ahtisaari President of the Republic of Finland, H.E. Mr. Helmut Kohl Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany , H.E. Mrs. Gro Harlem Brundtland Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Norway , H.E. Mr. Lech Walesa President of the Republic of Poland , H.E. M. Jean-Luc Dehaene Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Belgium , H.E. M. Liamine Zeroual President of the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria, H.E. Mr. Ion Iliescu President of Romania , H.E. Sheikh Jaber Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah Amir of the State of Kuwait , H.E. Dato' Seri Dr. Mahathir Mohamad Prime Minister of Malaysia , H.E. Dr. Janez Drnovsek Prime Minister of the Republic of Slovenia , H.E. El Hadj Omar Bongo President of the Gabonese Republic , H.E. Mr. Levon Ter-Petrossian President of the Republic of Armenia , H.E. M. Paul Biya President of the Republic of Cameroon , H.E. M. Habib Thiam Prime Minister of the Republic of Senegal , H.E. Mr. Va'clav Klaus Prime Minister of the Czech Republic , H.E. Mr. Alberto Fujimori Fujimori President of the Republic of Peru , H.E. Mr. Chuan Leekpai Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Thailand , H.E. The Hon. Ali Hassan Mwinyi President of the United Republic of Tanzania , His Majesty King Mswati III of the Kingdom of Swaziland , H.E. Mr. Joaquim Alberto Chissano President of the Republic of Mozambique , H.E. Mr. Kim Pyong Sik Vice-President of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea , H.E. Mr. Victor S. Chernomyrdin Prime Minister of the Russian Federation , H.E. Dr. Ernesto Samper Pizano President of the Republic of Colombia , H.E. Ing. Juan Carlos Wasmosy President of the Republic of Paraguay , H.E. The Rt. Hon. Percival James Patterson Prime Minister of Jamaica , H.E. Mr. Fidel V. Ramos President of the Republic of the Philippines , H.E. Begum Khaleda Zia Prime Minister of the People's Republic of Bangladesh , H.E. Mr. Albert Gore Vice-President of the United States of America , H.E. Mr. Lennart Meri President of the Republic of Estonia , H.E. Mr. Heydar Alirza ogly Aliyev President of the Azerbaijani Republic , H.E. Dr. Ramiro de Leon Carpio President of the Republic of Guatemala , H.E. Mr. Mare'chal Mobuto Sese Seko President of the Republic of Zaire , H.E. Dr. Fidel Castro Ruz President of the Council of State and the Council of Ministers of the Republic of Cuba , H.E. The Rt. Hon. Dr. Ntsu Mokhehle Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Lesotho , H.E. Sir Ketumile Masire President of the Republic of Botswana , H.E. Mr. Puntsagiin Jasrai Prime Minister of Mongolia , H.E. The Hon. Paul Keating Prime Minister of Australia , H.E. The Hon. Daniel Toroitich arap Moi President and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Kenya , H.E. Dr. Franjo Tudjman President of the Republic of Croatia , H.E. Madame Ruth Dreifuss Federal Counsellor, Head of the Federal Department of the Interior of the Swiss Confederation , H.E. Dr. Haris Silajdzic Prime Minister of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, H.E. The Hon. Dr. Edward Fenech Adami Prime Minister of the Republic of Malta, H.E. Lic. Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada President of the Republic of Bolivia , H.E. Mrs. Violeta Barrios de Chamorro President of Nicaragua , H.E. Mr. Jacques Santer President of the European Community , H.E. Mr. Nelson Rorihlahla Mandela President of the Republic of South Africa , H.E. Mr. Alberto Dahik Vice-President of the Republic of Ecuador , H.E. The Hon. Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga President of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka , H.E. Mr. Daniel Kablan Duncan Prime Minister of the Republic of Co^te d'Ivoire , H.E. Mr. Eduard A. Shevardnadze President of the Republic of Georgia , H.E. Ing. Jose' Mari'a Figueres Olsen President of the Republic of Costa Rica , H.E. Mr. Yoweri Kaguta Museveni President of the Republic of Uganda , H.E. Mr. Alpha Oumar Konare President of the Republic of Mali , H.E. Mr. Abdellatif Filali Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Morocco , His Eminence Angelo Cardinal Sodano Secretary of State of the Holy See , H.E. Mr. Alyaksandr Lukashenka President of the Republic of Belarus , H.E. Mr. John Bruton Prime Minister of Ireland , H.E. Mr. Guntis Ulmanis President of the Republic of Latvia , H.E. Mr. Islam A. Karimov President of the Republic of Uzbekistan , H.E. General Lansana Conte President of the Republic of Guinea , H.E. Dr. Mario Frick Prime Minister of the Principality of Liechtenstein , H.E. Dr. Sali Berisha President of the Republic of Albania , H.E. Captain Yahya A. J. J. Jammeh President of the Republic of the Gambia , H.E. Dr. Arpa'd Go"ncz President of the Republic of Hungary , H.E. Mr. Algirdas Mykolas Brazauskas President of the Republic of Lithuania , H.E. Mr. David Oddsson Prime Minister of the Republic of Iceland , H.E. Dr. Carlos Roberto Reina Idiaquez President of the Republic of Honduras , H.E. The Rt. Hon. Man Mohan Adhikari Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Nepal , H.E. Mr. Hassan Gouled Aptidon President of the Republic of Djibouti , H.E. Mr. Zhelyu Zhelev President of the Republic of Bulgaria , H.E. General Joao Bernardo Vieira President of the Republic of Guinea-Bissau , H.E. Mr. Jean-Claude Juncker Prime Minister of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg , H.E. Mr. Glafcos Clerides President of the Republic of Cyprus , H.E. Mr. Ange-Fe'lix Patasse President of the Central African Republic , H.E. Mr. Sidi Mohamed Ould Boubacar Prime Minister of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania , H.E. Mr. Kiro Gligorov President of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia , H.E. Dr. Carlos Alberto Wahnon de Carvalho Veiga Prime Minister of the Republic of Cape Verde, H.E. Lt. Gen. Omer Hassan Ahmed Al Bashir President of the Republic of the Sudan , H.E. Dr. Armando Calderon Sol President of the Republic of El Salvador , H.E. Mr. Andrei Nicolae Sangheli Prime Minister of the Republic of Moldova , H.E. Mr. Renzo Ghiotti Captain Regent of the Republic of San Marino, H.E. Mr. Emomaili Rakhmonov President of the Republic of Tajikistan, H.E. Mr. Runaldo Ronald Venetiaan President of the Republic of Suriname, H.E. Mr. Michal Kovac President of the Slovak Republic , H.E. Mr. Edem Kodjo Prime Minister of the Togolese Republic, H.E. The Hon. Dr. Kennedy A. Simmonds Prime Minister of Saint Kitts and Nevis , H.E. Mr. Jacinto Peynado Vice-President of the Dominican Republic, H.E. Mr. Halifa Houmadi Prime Minister of the Islamic Federal Republic of the Comoros , H.E. Mr. Sylvestre Ntibantunganya President of the Republic of Burundi, H.E. Mr. Abdorabo Mansoor Hadi Vice-President of the Republic of Yemen , H.E. Mr. Miguel dos Angos da Canha Lisboa Trovoada Head of State of the Democratic Republic of Sao Tome and Principe, H.E. Mr. Francisque Ravony Prime Minister of the Republic of Madagascar, His Highness Sheikh Sultan Bin Zayed Al-Nahayan Deputy Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates , H.E. The Hon. Philip Muller Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of the Marshall Islands , H.E. Dr. Paulo Renato de Souza Minister for Education and Sports of the Federative Republic of Brazil , H.E. Mr. Jose' Angel Gurria Trevin~a Minister for Foreign Affairs of the United Mexican States , H.E. Mr. Abdallah Kallel Minister of State, Adviser to the President of the Republic of Tunisia , H.E. Mr. Desire' Vieyra Ministre d'Etat, Charge' de la Coordination de l'Action Gourvernementale of the Republic of Benin, H.E. The Hon. Peter Gresham Minister for Social Welfare of New Zealand, H.E. Shaikh Isa Bin Ali Al-Khalifa Minister for Labour and Social Affairs of the State of Bahrain , H.E. Mr. Sadoom Hamadi Adviser to the Office of the President of the Republic of Iraq , H.E. The Hon. Ratu Jo Nacola Minister for Regional Development and Multi-Ethnic Affairs of the Republic of Fiji, H.E. The Hon. Dharmanand Goopt Fokeer Minister for Social Security and National Solidarity of the Republic of Mauritius , H.E. The Hon. Ismail Shafeeu Minister for Planning, Human Resources and Environment of the Republic of Maldives, H.E. Mr. Ali Khalil Minister of Social Affairs and Labour of the Syrian Arab Republic , H.E. Mr. Fares Bouez Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Lebanese Republic, H.E. Mrs. Salwa Damen Al-Masri Minister for Social Development of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan , H.E. Mr. Omar Mustafa Muntasser Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya , H.E. Chief Anthony A. Ani Minister for Foreign Affairs and Finance of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, H.E. Mr. Arse`ne Tsaty-Boungou Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Republic of the Congo , H.E. Mr. Usmonakum Ibraimov Vice-Prime Minister of the Republic of Kyrgyzstan , H.E. Dr. Ali Akbar Velayati Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Islamic Republic of Iran*
* The representative of the Islamic Republic of Iran delivered a message from his head of State in advance, on 10 March 1995.

Chapter VIII    [ Up ]

ADOPTION OF THE REPORT OF THE SUMMIT

1. The Rapporteur-General introduced and orally revised the draft report of the Summit (A/CONF.166/L.4 and Add.1) at the 14th plenary meeting, on 12 March 1995.

2. At the same meeting, the Summit adopted the draft report, as revised, and authorized the Rapporteur-General to complete the report, in conformity with the practice of the United Nations, with a view to submitting it to the General Assembly at its fiftieth session.

Chapter IX    [ Up ]

CLOSURE OF THE SUMMIT

1. At the 14th plenary meeting, on 12 March 1995, the representative of the Philippines, on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the Group of 77 and China, introduced a draft resolution (A/CONF.166/L.6) expressing the Summit's gratitude to the host country.

2. At the same meeting, the Summit adopted the draft resolution (for the text, see chap. I, resolution 2).

3. Also at the same meeting, statements were made by the representatives of the Philippines (on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the Group of 77 and China), France (on behalf of the European Union) and the United States of America.

4. After a statement had been made by the Secretary-General, the President of the Summit made a concluding statement and declared the Summit closed.

Annex I    [ Up ]

LIST OF DOCUMENTS

A/CONF.166/1 Provisional agenda
A/CONF.166/2 Provisional rules of procedure: note by the Secretariat
A/CONF.166/3 Organizational and procedural matters: note by the Secretariat
A/CONF.166/4 Accreditation of non-governmental organizations in accordance with the rules for their participation set out in Preparatory Committee decision 2: note by the Secretariat
A/CONF.166/5 Note verbale dated 2 February 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Bangladesh to the United Nations addressed to the secretariat of the World Summit for Social Development
A/CONF.166/6 Participation of intergovernmental organizations in the work of the World Summit for Social Development: note by the secretariat of the Summit
A/CONF.166/7 Report of the Credentials Committee
A/CONF.166/8 Note verbale dated 11 March 1995 from the delegation of Greece to the World Summit for Social Development addressed to the secretariat of the Summit
A/CONF.166/L.1 and Draft declaration and draft programme of action: note Corr.1 and 2 by the Secretary-General
A/CONF.166/L.2 Additional proposals for the draft declaration and draft programme of action: note by the Secretariat
A/CONF.166/L.3 and Report of the Main Committee Add.1, Add.1/Corr.1-3, Add.2 and 3, Add.3/ Corr.1, Add.4, Add.4/ Corr.1, Add.5-7 and Add.7/Corr.1
A/CONF.166/L.4 and Draft report of the Summit Add.1
A/CONF.166/L.5 Declaration and Programme of Action of the World Summit for Social Development: draft resolution submitted by the Philippines (on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the Group of 77 and China)
A/CONF.166/L.6 Expression of thanks to the people and Government of Denmark: draft resolution submitted by the Philippines (on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the Group of 77 and China)
A/CONF.166/INF/1 Information for participants
A/CONF.166/INF/2 and Provisional list of delegations to the Summit Add.1
A/CONF.166/INF/3 and List of documents circulated for information Add.1-4
A/CONF.166/PC/28 Report of the Preparatory Committee for the World Summit for Social Development on its third session

Annex II    [ Up ]

OPENING STATEMENTS

Statement by Poul Nyrup Rasmussen, Prime Minister of Denmark and President of the World Summit for Social Development

The American astronaut, James Lovell, had no doubts about the qualities of the planet Earth, when in 1968 on board Apollo 8 he described the Earth as a grand oasis to the vastness of space.

But we have not treated our planet in a way that warrants this description. Man has often treated nature unwisely and short-sightedly. We are gradually beginning to do things better. But man has treated man even worse. In this century alone we have lived in the shadow of two world wars and of totalitarian regimes, not to mention the nuclear bomb.

Security of the State has been more important than security of people. We have now learned that real lasting security is based upon the security of people.

We have come to a turning-point for mankind. At last we recognize that the security of people is the main topic of the international agenda.

Let this Summit focus on the security of people.

The Summit is the first of its kind: a World Summit for Social Development. We will provide leadership and direction.

I wish to thank the General Assembly of the United Nations for having chosen Copenhagen as the venue for the World Summit for Social Development. The Government and people of Denmark are proud to be hosting this Summit.

I welcome you to Copenhagen and Denmark. I hope that you will find time to get to know this country, its people, its culture and its social development.

I wish to express my deep appreciation to the Summit for having elected me President.

My task is made easier through the tremendous work done by the Secretary-General of the United Nations, his collaborators in the Secretariat, and the Preparatory Committee.

In particular, I wish to pay tribute to the Chairman of the Preparatory Committee, Ambassador Juan Somavia of Chile. For years he has worked hard and with dedication to make this Summit come true.

Let us use the Summit to turn the analysis of problems and possibilities into concrete commitments and actions as we did in Rio.

If we are to shape the future, we must have goals, ambition and decisions. These we have. We are gathered here to promote social development and social justice, placing the needs, rights and aspirations of people at the centre of our decisions and joint actions. We want to open a new era of international cooperation between Governments and people based on a spirit of partnership.

The core issues to be discussed at the Summit - poverty, employment and social integration - are well chosen. At this Summit we are discussing the real problems, which concern all people. Therefore the Summit is at the very heart of all political work and governance.

We need to focus on human security. Human security and social progress must be maintained by ensuring proper living conditions.

Each person's security has to do with adequate income and employment, education and training, health and housing, equality and legal protection and the exercise of human rights.

The key word is solidarity. The means are political power and economic and sustainable growth used for the right purposes. It is not a question of whether we can afford it. It is a question of priorities and determination.

We must find new answers to these well-known, fundamental questions.

Poverty is linked to lack of access to resources, including knowledge. Poor people are easily neglected by policy makers. Anti-poverty programmes alone are not sufficient. Democratic participation is necessary to ensure equal access to opportunities, public services and political life.

All Governments should undertake policies geared to a better distribution of wealth and income. We must offer social protection and opportunities for those who cannot support themselves. We must assist people in social distress. In short, we must empower people to become genuine partners in developing our societies.

For the poorest countries, we must extend the national effort to include international actions of solidarity.

For many years the international community was divided into ideological blocs. This Summit is historic as it gives us the chance - for the first time after the cold war - to share a common vision on how to solve the social problems of the world.

Let this Summit of hope result in better opportunities for an exchange of experiences. No country can claim to have solved its social problems. Some countries are rich. Some are poor. The acuteness of the problems varies. But they have one thing in common: they are an offence to human dignity and a threat to mankind if not attended to in time.

Social problems are of a size and a complexity that call for new solutions, new alliances and new values. Many nations have welfare systems that could be an inspiration to others. It is our task to encourage people to take an active part in creating new societies.

We have learned that social progress will not be realized simply through the free market forces. Nothing short of the political will to invest - nationally and internationally - in people's well-being will accomplish the objective of social security.

The private sector, including businesses and enterprises, must assume a co-responsibility for the solution of social problems.

This new partnership for social development must include actions that enable poor and disadvantaged people to participate fully and productively in the economy and in society.

This Summit is a historic and unique platform for global social development. But we must not give the impression that the Summit alone will dramatically change daily life. We still have to put actions behind the words.

The true significance of the Summit will therefore have to be measured by what happens after the Summit. This is only the beginning of a new, global process. But the difference between last week and next week should be increased awareness and the mobilization of resources for social development.

We gather here in Copenhagen for a Summit of hope, commitment and action.

Let us transform hope into action. That is what people expect from us.

I am confident that we can forge a new partnership for social development. The Copenhagen Summit will make a difference. Because we have decided so.

Statement by Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Secretary-General of the United Nations

The message of this World Summit for Social Development should be clear. The international community is today taking a clear stand against social injustice, exclusion and poverty in the world.

So, as we celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Organization, we should ask ourselves some searching questions about our own record.

We should ask how seriously we have taken our Charter commitments. Can we say that we have fulfilled our solemn undertaking, entered into 50 years ago at San Francisco, to promote "the economic and social advancement of all peoples"?

Today's global economy affects everyone. We also know that its effects are not all positive. It erodes traditional ties of solidarity among individuals. It has marginalized entire countries and regions. The gap between rich and poor is getting wider.

So the task before us today is nothing more nor less than to rethink the notion of collective social responsibility.

A new social contract, at the global level, is required, to bring hope to States and to nations, and to men and women around the world. That should be the focus of this World Summit. That is how I believe its work should be seen.

When, in 1992, the General Assembly took the initiative of calling this World Summit, its aim was to make social development a major priority for the international community. The agenda for this Summit meeting faithfully reflects that intention. We will be discussing how to carry forward the fight against poverty; how to combat social exclusion and disintegration; how to create productive employment; and how to awaken a new awareness of social responsibility at the international level.

It is clear from these concerns that this Copenhagen World Summit is part of a process. It is part of the process of profound reflection and debate on which the international community has embarked - about itself and its future, and about the role of the individual human being.

As part of this collective rethinking, the international community has given a good deal of thought to the position of the individual human being. At Rio we debated the relationship between the human being and the environment. At Vienna we looked at the human being as the bearer of rights. The human person as a collective being was the theme of the Cairo Population Conference. And once more, the human person - this time through the rights and status of women - will bring us together next September, at Beijing.

The concept of social development gives coherence and perspective to the entire process of reflection in which the international community has been engaged.

Social development says that only within a social order based on justice can the individual human being reach his or her full potential. Social development says, too, that real economic progress is impossible without progress in the social sphere. Social development is also the international community's political response - political in the fullest sense of the term - to the global society in which we live. That is why I see it as part of the task of the United Nations to attempt to provide such a response - starting now.

Clearly, no one has a ready-made model or answer. But it is possible for us to define what I would call "priority objectives", which are basically three in number:

Providing social protection for the individual;

Assisting social integration;

Maintaining social peace.

These are the three priority goals which I would like to consider with you for a few moments.

Providing social protection for the individual is the ultimate goal of this Conference and, as we are about to begin our work, I think it is important not to lose sight of the indissoluble link between the promotion of social development and the protection of human rights.

In 1948, the Universal Declaration made explicit the social dimension of human rights. That dimension was to be still more strongly reaffirmed in the Covenants of 1966, particularly the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, to whose importance I would call attention. It was in that context that the basic concept of the right to development came into being a few years later.

In the name of that concept and its underlying values, we are now under a compelling obligation to tackle the problem of poverty in the world.

It has to be remembered that 1.3 billion people are currently living in a state of absolute poverty, and that 1.5 billion have no access to the most elementary health care. We also know that the principal victims of poverty are women, since they represent more than 70 per cent of the disinherited of the Earth.

It should also be emphasized that, although a struggle against social inequalities must be waged all over the planet, the scale of the problem, as well as its severity, differ from one region to another.

Only through constant awareness of the realities of the world can we, here in Copenhagen, truly be the spokesmen of all those who desire improved social justice, and play a part in creating a new social policy on a global scale.

The second priority goal I wish to propose is that of assisting social integration. This is all the more necessary as disturbing situations of exclusion and marginalization are developing all over the world.

To struggle for social integration, therefore, means condemning selfishness and indifference first of all. It also means combating all forms of discrimination throughout the world, whatever their cause. It also means calling upon all humanity to show tolerance, solidarity, and involvement. Lastly, it means giving all men, women, and children the education they need in order to take their place in society.

The World Summit for Social Development has quite rightly emphasized the connection between the struggle against poverty, the campaign for social integration and the creation of productive jobs. In fact in the world of today, employment is an essential factor in integration. On the other hand, unemployment is a form of exclusion leading to a combination of social handicaps.

It is primarily the duty of States to implement dynamic social policies. Social development calls for wide-ranging political action, particularly in the area of laws and regulations.

But social development is a matter, not only for States, but also for the entire United Nations system. The latter has long been active in the service of social progress. Many of its organs, such as the United Nations Development Programme, and numerous specialized agencies, including the International Labour Organization and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, have done pioneering work in this area.

However, in this social project of ours, we must also take account of the extraordinary capacity for mobilization of the non-governmental organizations, and the force for integration represented by private enterprise and investors.

Maintaining social peace is the third priority goal which I invite you to pursue. In fact, there is a clear interaction between political issues and social issues.

On the one hand, it is obvious that a stable political environment is essential to harmonious social development. One of the purposes of political activity is to give tangible reality to social aspirations.

On the other hand, it is equally clear that a dynamic social environment is one of the requirements for political stability itself. For a State in which inequality and privilege prevail is potentially in danger of suffering the gravest social upheavals. A State which, by not permitting satisfactory social integration, generates large numbers of marginalized people has to fear the most unpredictable social explosions. It has to be clearly stated: political serenity goes hand in hand with social contentment.

Furthermore, it is now well known that most of the armed conflicts facing the United Nations are internal conflicts taking place within nations.

We also know that most of those conflicts have clear economic and social causes. Consequently, we can reaffirm once more the indissoluble link between the promotion of development and the preservation of peace.

I have sought to place the World Summit for Social Development in the perspective of the major goals of the United Nations because, as Secretary- General of the Organization, I am conscious of our collective responsibility towards future generations. I therefore hope that the United Nations may acquire the necessary means to follow up this Conference, so that the important recommendations adopted here may have a genuine impact on the lives of peoples and nations. I sincerely trust that the Bretton Woods institutions will play a full role in the social action which we are now redefining and reinventing.

For the social development project is an opportunity for the international community as a whole to say:

No to the inevitability of crisis!

No to the persistence of inequalities!

No to the division of the world!

Giving social issues the status of universal priorities shows our determination to accept responsibility for the collective destiny of international society and to establish a new planet-wide pact of solidarity.

Annex III    [ Up ]

CLOSING STATEMENTS

Statement by Poul Nyrup Rasmussen, Prime Minister of Denmark and President of the World Summit for Social Development

It falls upon me now to bring to a close the World Summit for Social Development.

What lies ahead of us is a task even more important than the one we have just successfully completed. For documents, well crafted as they may be, and commitments, forceful as they may be, must stand the test of time. It is our duty to ensure that this is done.

I would not want to close this meeting without expressing my profound appreciation for all those whose personal contribution has made this Summit possible:

To Ambassador Somavia, whose country proposed the Summit, and on whose broad shoulders so much of its preparations fell. May I commend his untiring work on behalf of the Summit; he guided the negotiating process with tenacity, skill and commitment; his intellect, spirit, constancy of purpose and optimism were instrumental to our success. Our gratitude also goes to the talented diplomats who so ably assisted Ambassador Somavia in his work, both here and in New York: Ambassadors Richard Butler of Australia, Koos Richelle of the Netherlands, Ismail Razali of Malaysia and Prakesh Shah of India;

To you, Mr. Secretary-General, for your personal and untiring efforts on behalf of the Summit which demonstrate your commitment to the role of the United Nations in development. Many of the heads of State and Government who have been with us over the past two days know first hand the strength of your conviction. If this Summit was attended by so many eminent statesmen and women, it is in no small measure due to you personally, but also to the entire United Nations Secretariat staff, led by Under-Secretaries-General Ismat Kittani and Nitin Desai and Conference Coordinator Jacques Baudot, who were the true backbone of the Summit;

And, finally, to all the other participants of civil society, who have brought their expertise, their talent and, above all, their imagination and enthusiasm to this Summit and its preparations. Their spirit and impatience for change brought much passion and energy to our task.

The Declaration we have just adopted states that the General Assembly should hold a special session in the year 2000 to appraise how far we will have gone by then in implementing the results of this meeting. I would like, when we meet five years hence, to look back to this Summit of hope, as many have called it, as a Summit of fulfilled expectations.

 

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(This document has been made available in electronic format by the United Nations.)

 

 

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