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Commission on Sustainable Development 6th Session, 1998 (CSD-6)

Women’s Caucus Amendments (in CAPITAL LETTERS) to the Draft Decision of the 6th of the Commission on Sustainable Development on Strategic Approaches to Freshwater Management (Version 24 April, 1998)

Merged paragraphs 4, 5. In this regard, the Commission reaffirms that water resources are essential for satisfying basic human needs, health and food production, the restoration and maintenance of ecosystems, and for social and economic development in general. Agriculture accounts for the major part of global freshwater use. It is imperative that water resources development, management and protection should be planned in an integrated manner, taking into account both short and long-term needs. Consequently, the priority to be accorded to the social dimension of freshwater management is of fundamental importance. This should be reflected in an integrated approach to freshwater in order to be coherent with the objective of achieving sustainable development that is truly people-centered. It is important that consideration of equity, in particular in addressing the problems of people living in poverty, THE MAJORITY OF WHOM ARE WOMEN, become an integral part in the formulation of strategic approaches to the integrated water management at national, regional and international level. An equally important goal is to ensure that water use does not undermine the integrity of the ecosystems. Another set of crucial issues relate to the links between the water quality with sanitation and protection of human health.

11 and 12. Urges Governments, with the support of the international community, to address the numerous gaps identified in the path towards integrated water resources management. Areas that require further attention include, among others: awareness of the scope and function of surface and groundwater resources; the need for human resource development and participatory approaches notable including women; INCORPORATING EFFORTS TOWARDS INTEGRATED FRESHWATER MANAGEMENT INTO LOCAL AGENDA 21 PROCESSES; the role of ecosystems in the provision of goods and services;

New 19. Information and data have a fundamental economic value for assisting in the management and use of water resources, and in the protection of the environment. The commission agrees that users of information must be associated in the collection, processing and analysis of water related data and information. Because women have a particular role in utilizing and conserving water resources on a daily basis, their knowledge and experience should be (DELETE: considered) INTEGRATED as a component of any sustainable water management programme.

Old 19. Encourages Governments to establish and maintain effective information and monitoring networks and further promote the exchange and dissemination of information - including related socio-economic and environmental data, gender differentiated, (DELETE: where appropriate) - needed for policy formulation, planning and investment decisions and operational management of freshwater resources, and to harmonize data collection at basin/aquifer level.

23. Calls upon the international community to support national efforts in the areas outlined above. The United Nations system is called upon to play a central role in the development and coordination of relevant data and information networks, strengthen regional and global monitoring systems, carry out periodic global assessments and analyses of water resources availability (both quality and quantity) and changes in demand, to assist in identifying potentially serious crisis and in assessing the interaction between inland freshwater resources management, (DELETE: and) environmental AND HEALTH issues, and promote the broadest exchange and dissemination of relevant information, in particular to developing countries. Priority should be given to national and international standardization of definitions, development of user-friendly formats, and information access and exchange.

24. Urges Governments to establish national coordination mechanisms, as already envisaged in the Mar del Plata Action Plan, providing for the involvement of all relevant parts of government and public authorities, in the formulation and implementation of integrated water resource development and management plans and policies. Such mechanisms should also provide for consultation with major groups. This involves the participation of water users and the public in planning, implementing, and evaluating water projects, INCLUDING THE DEVELOPMENT OF APPROPRIATE INDICATORS.

27. Encourages Governments to establish an enabling environment to facilitate partnerships between public and private sectors and non-governmental organizations, aiming towards improved local capacity to protect water resources, through significant outreach educational programmes and improved public access to information. BECAUSE OF THEIR SIGNIFICANT KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE AND THEIR ROLE IN UTILISING AND CONSERVING WATER, WOMEN SHOULD BE SYSTEMATICALLY INVOLVED IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMES AND INFORMATION SERVICES. The pivotal role of women should be reflected in institutional arrangements for the development and management of water resources. There is a need to strengthen the role of women, who should have an equal voice with regard to water resource development and management and the sharing of benefits.

29. Encourages Governments to stimulate and remove impediments to research and development cooperation, together with the development of technologies for sustainable water management and use, and to increase efficiency, reduce pollution and promote sustainable agriculture and food production systems. This involves the adaptation and diffusion of new and innovative techniques and technologies, both private and public, and the transfer of technologies to developing countries, inter alia on concessional terms, as mutually agreed, taking into account the need to protect intellectual property rights. The use of local and traditional technology and knowledge LARGELY HELD BY WOMEN should be (DELETE: promoted) PROTECTED FROM EXPLOITATIVE USE, and South/South cooperation should be encouraged.

30. Urges Governments, industry and international organization to promote technology transfer and research cooperation to foster sustainable agricultural practices which promote efficient water use and prevent pollution of surface water and groundwater. These technologies should include the improvement of crops grown on marginal sites, erosion control practices, and the adaptation of farming systems. They should also improve water efficiency in both irrigated and rain-fed areas and improve the adaptation and productivity of drought-tolerant crop species. Farmer participation, PARTICULARLY RURAL WOMEN, in farm research, irrigation projects and watershed management should be encouraged. Research results and technologies should be available to both small and large producers.

39. The private sector represents an important new source of investment in the water sector. Local and national water management systems should therefore be designed in ways that encourage and support public/private partnerships. It is important to ensure that water management systems are organized so that they will be robust and, once established, can support themselves. The introduction of enabling financial framework conditions will be of paramount importance, if private sector finance is to be mobilized. IN THE LIGHT OF THE DISCUSSIONS OF INDUSTRY, TRADE UNIONS AND NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANISATIONS IN THE DIALOGUE ON INDUSTRY AND FRESHWATER AT THE CSD ON APRIL 22, 1998, GOVERNMENTS AND THE THREE STAKEHOLDER GROUPS ARE ENCOURAGED TO ENGAGE IN AN ONGOING DIALOGUE EXPLORING THE ISSUES OF WATER AS AN ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE.
that water resources are essential for satisfying basic human needs, health and food production, the restoration and maintenance of ecosystems, and for social and economic development in general. Agriculture accounts for the major part of global freshwater use. It is imperative that water resources development, management and protection should be planned in an integrated manner, taking into account both short and long-term needs. Consequently, the priority to be accorded to the social dimension of freshwater management is of fundamental importance. This should be reflected in an integrated approach to freshwater in order to be coherent with the objective of achieving sustainable development that is truly people-centered. It is important that consideration of equity, in particular in addressing the problems of people living in poverty, THE MAJORITY OF WHOM ARE WOMEN, become an integral part in the formulation of strategic approaches to the integrated water management at national, regional and international level. An equally important goal is to ensure that water use does not undermine the integrity of the ecosystems. Another set of crucial issues relate to the links between the water quality with sanitation and protection of human health.

11 and 12. Urges Governments, with the support of the international community, to address the numerous gaps identified in the path towards integrated water resources management. Areas that require further attention include, among others: awareness of the scope and function of surface and groundwater resources; the need for human resource development and participatory approaches notable including women; INCORPORATING EFFORTS TOWARDS INTEGRATED FRESHWATER MANAGEMENT INTO LOCAL AGENDA 21 PROCESSES; the role of ecosystems in the provision of goods and services;

New 19. Information and data have a fundamental economic value for assisting in the management and use of water resources, and in the protection of the environment. The commission agrees that users of information must be associated in the collection, processing and analysis of water related data and information. Because women have a particular role in utilizing and conserving water resources on a daily basis, their knowledge and experience should be (DELETE: considered) INTEGRATED as a component of any sustainable water management programme.

Old 19. Encourages Governments to establish and maintain effective information and monitoring networks and further promote the exchange and dissemination of information - including related socio-economic and environmental data, gender differentiated, (DELETE: where appropriate) - needed for policy formulation, planning and investment decisions and operational management of freshwater resources, and to harmonize data collection at basin/aquifer level.

23. Calls upon the international community to support national efforts in the areas outlined above. The United Nations system is called upon to play a central role in the development and coordination of relevant data and information networks, strengthen regional and global monitoring systems, carry out periodic global assessments and analyses of water resources availability (both quality and quantity) and changes in demand, to assist in identifying potentially serious crisis and in assessing the interaction between inland freshwater resources management, (DELETE: and) environmental AND HEALTH issues, and promote the broadest exchange and dissemination of relevant information, in particular to developing countries. Priority should be given to national and international standardization of definitions, development of user-friendly formats, and information access and exchange.

24. Urges Governments to establish national coordination mechanisms, as already envisaged in the Mar del Plata Action Plan, providing for the involvement of all relevant parts of government and public authorities, in the formulation and implementation of integrated water resource development and management plans and policies. Such mechanisms should also provide for consultation with major groups. This involves the participation of water users and the public in planning, implementing, and evaluating water projects, INCLUDING THE DEVELOPMENT OF APPROPRIATE INDICATORS.

27. Encourages Governments to establish an enabling environment to facilitate partnerships between public and private sectors and non-governmental organizations, aiming towards improved local capacity to protect water resources, through significant outreach educational programmes and improved public access to information. BECAUSE OF THEIR SIGNIFICANT KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE AND THEIR ROLE IN UTILISING AND CONSERVING WATER, WOMEN SHOULD BE SYSTEMATICALLY INVOLVED IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMES AND INFORMATION SERVICES. The pivotal role of women should be reflected in institutional arrangements for the development and management of water resources. There is a need to strengthen the role of women, who should have an equal voice with regard to water resource development and management and the sharing of benefits.

29. Encourages Governments to stimulate and remove impediments to research and development cooperation, together with the development of technologies for sustainable water management and use, and to increase efficiency, reduce pollution and promote sustainable agriculture and food production systems. This involves the adaptation and diffusion of new and innovative techniques and technologies, both private and public, and the transfer of technologies to developing countries, inter alia on concessional terms, as mutually agreed, taking into account the need to protect intellectual property rights. The use of local and traditional technology and knowledge LARGELY HELD BY WOMEN should be (DELETE: promoted) PROTECTED FROM EXPLOITATIVE USE, and South/South cooperation should be encouraged.

30. Urges Governments, industry and international organization to promote technology transfer and research cooperation to foster sustainable agricultural practices which promote efficient water use and prevent pollution of surface water and groundwater. These technologies should include the improvement of crops grown on marginal sites, erosion control practices, and the adaptation of farming systems. They should also improve water efficiency in both irrigated and rain-fed areas and improve the adaptation and productivity of drought-tolerant crop species. Farmer participation, PARTICULARLY RURAL WOMEN, in farm research, irrigation projects and watershed management should be encouraged. Research results and technologies should be available to both small and large producers.

39. The private sector represents an important new source of investment in the water sector. Local and national water management systems should therefore be designed in ways that encourage and support public/private partnerships. It is important to ensure that water management systems are organized so that they will be robust and, once established, can support themselves. The introduction of enabling financial framework conditions will be of paramount importance, if private sector finance is to be mobilized. IN THE LIGHT OF THE DISCUSSIONS OF INDUSTRY, TRADE UNIONS AND NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANISATIONS IN THE DIALOGUE ON INDUSTRY AND FRESHWATER AT THE CSD ON APRIL 22, 1998, GOVERNMENTS AND THE THREE STAKEHOLDER GROUPS ARE ENCOURAGED TO ENGAGE IN AN ONGOING DIALOGUE EXPLORING THE ISSUES OF WATER AS AN ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE.

 

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