Earth Summit 2002   Stakeholder Organisations

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Business / Private Sector 

Business / Public Sector 

Farmers 

Intergovernmental Bodies 

Local Authorities 

Multi – Stakeholder Organisations 

Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs)

Professional Associations 

Scientific Communities 

Trade Unions 

Women 

Youth 

 

Business / Private Sector

World Business Council on Sustainable Development (WBCSD) 
http://www.wbcsd.ch/  
The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) is a coalition of 150 international companies united by a shared commitment to sustainable development via the three pillars of economic growth, ecological balance and social progress. The WBCSD has members drawn from more than 30 countries and 20 major industrial sectors. They also benefit from a Global Network of 30 national and regional business councils and partner organizations involving some 700 business leaders globally. The WBCSD is member-led organisation with a well established network whose mission is to provide business leadership as a catalyst for change toward sustainable development, and to promote the role of eco-efficiency, innovation and corporate social responsibility. The Council of the WBCSD meets annually providing a forum for discussing the organisation’s priorities and strategy. This is in terms of: business leadership; policy development; best practice; and global outreach. The WBCSD has prioritised the issue of freshwater. Their website gives details of many successful case studies. These include: in the field of technology and innovation, the Gerling project: Providing drinking water resources to a small Mediterranean island. In terms of Eco-Efficiency General Motors in Mexico run: Water Conservation and Reuse Program. Dialogue and Partnerships have been building through projects like: BC Hydro: Collaboration Through Water Use Planning, CH2M Hill & Suez: Partnerships on Water; and Severn Trent: Water Partnership for St. Petersberg.

Unilever
http://www.unilever.com  
Unilever is a large multi-national corporation dedicated to meeting the everyday needs of people everywhere. Unilever has a drive to serve consumers all over the world. The company has a sustainability program and is committed towards sustainable development principles.
Unilever recognises that water stewardship is an important part of its business as many of its products revolve around water both upstream and downstream in their life cycle process. The company has developed a structured approach to dealing with water as a business, developed a set of guiding principles, and commissioned a detailed imprint of Unilever’s impacts. Unilever has been involved in a number of water based projects worldwide, case studies include: the Pasig river Rehabilitation Project in the Philippines; the Living Lakes initiative to restore and protect lakes on 4 continents; Zero liquid discharge initiatives in India; Improving water quality on the West Bank, Palestine.

Severn Trent plc
http://www.severn-trent.com  
Severn Trent Plc is an environmental services company and a leading provider of water, waste and utility services. The group includes Severn Trent Water, Biffa Waste Services and Severn Trent Services, and generates revenues of £1.7 billion and employs more than 14,000 people in the UK, US and Europe. Severn Trent is characterised by experience and environment in freshwater and in sanitation issues by policy and action.

 

Business / Public Sector

Randwater
http://www.randwater.com  
Randwater in South Africa realised the potential water services delivery challenges likely to be placed on the new democratic order, and adopted a pro-active corporate vision. This enabled Rand Water to contribute its expertise in the reconstruction and development of South Africa. This vision also enables Rand Water to play a role in the African Renaissance by forming partnerships with established water services institutions and providers. Particular capacity was required in the retail water operations arena (reticulation) and management terrain.
This led to the establishment of the Retail Water Operations Division, with a founding objective: "to ensure continuity of service in areas where a retail water supply organisation is in difficulty; to take actions which will overcome the immediate cause of difficulties; to develop a business structure which will ensure stable and sustainable supplies into the future in accordance with industry best practice and commercial sustainability; and to satisfy the need and requirement for community influence over the organisation in terms of prevailing laws and policies" . These objectives meant that Rand Water had to
"go beyond its conventional mandate and assist in the provision of basic sanitation and services, as also in the supply of clean water to communities."

 

Farmers

International Federation of Agricultural Producers (IFAP)
http://www.ifap.org  
IFAP is a worldwide organisation for national farmer organisations. IFAP was established in 1946 to secure the fullest cooperation between organizations of agricultural producers in meeting the optimum nutritional and consumptive requirements of the peoples of the world. It works to improve the economic and social status of all who live by and on the land. Freshwater issues and strategies are a major part of this organisation.

 

Intergovernmental Bodies

World Health Organisation (WHO)
http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/index.htm  
The World Health Organisation (WHO), has a mandate towards the protection of human health. The WHO defines health as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.
The WHO has been historically at the forefront of initiatives and programmes dealing with water supply and sanitation sector monitoring. The impetus to monitoring was provided by the International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade (1981-1990), which was a major outcome of the United Nations Water Conference, held in Mar del Plata, Argentina, 1977. 
At the end of the Decade, WHO and UNICEF decided to combine their experiences and resources in a Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation (JMP) intended for capacity building in information systems at the country level.
WHO and UNICEF have conducted a global exercise to assess the status of the water supply and sanitation sector as at the end of 1999. 

3rd World Water Forum Preparatory Committee
http://www.worldwaterforum.org/  
The World Water Council established the World Water Forum concept, a series of stepping stones towards global collaboration on water problems which threaten the health and safety of so many of the world's citizens. The 3rd World Water Forum, heralding the beginning of the 'century of water,' will take place in Japan in 2003.
Kyoto City has been selected as the venue and the event will take place in March of 2003. The 3rd World Water Forum will be a manifestation of global reactions to water and sanitation issues, and in this crucial sense the Forum will be a
'Forum created by all.'

United Nations Environment Progamme: Freshwater
http://freshwater.unep.net/  
The United Nations Environment Programme’s (UNEP) freshwater section provides information and support on freshwater issues. It strives to change the fact that about one-third of the world's population lives in countries with moderate to high water stress. The problems are most acute in Africa and West Asia but lack of water is already a major constraint to industrial and socio-economic growth in many other areas, including China, India and Indonesia. If present consumption patterns continue, two out of every three persons on Earth will live in water-stressed conditions by the year 2025. UNEP has a lead role in combating the declining state of the world's freshwater resources, in terms of quantity and quality, which may prove to be the dominant issue on the environment and development agenda of the coming century.

World Bank
http://www.worldbank.org  
The World Bank uses its financial resources, its highly trained staff, and its extensive knowledge base to individually help each developing country onto a path of stable, sustainable, and equitable growth. The main focus is on helping the poorest people and the poorest countries. As a result freshwater issues and strategy are high on the agenda of this organisation.
The Bank is now working in more than 100 developing economies, bringing a mix of finance and ideas to improve living standards and eliminate the worst forms of poverty. For each of its clients, the Bank works with government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector to formulate assistance strategies. Its country offices worldwide deliver the Bank's program in countries, liase with government and civil society, and work to increase understanding of development issues. The Bank has a network of support, knowledge and expertise and is a strong contributor towards the freshwater debate. A clear link has been made between poverty alleviation and sustainable development, the Bank is focusing on finding ways to ensure that economic growth does not come at the expense of the world's physical and ecological systems or the world's poor.

Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council
http://www.wsscc.org  
The Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) is a leading international organisation that enhances collaboration in the water supply and sanitation sector, specifically in order to attain universal coverage of water and sanitation services for poor people around the world. WSSCC is a cross between a professional association and an international NGO. It operates with a mandate from the United National General Assembly. 
The mission of the Council is “to accelerate the achievement of sustainable water, sanitation and waste management services to all people, with special attention to the unserved poor, by enhancing collaboration among developing countries and external support agencies and through concerted action programmes”.

The Council helps sector professionals to share their concerns, knowledge and experience with one another. It provides opportunities for problem solving, access to combined expertise, continuous dialogue on key issues, and publications which set out guidelines, procedures and codes of conduct developed by experts working together over several years. The main mechanisms that the Council adopts to achieve its objectives and carry out its tasks are:

A series of global and regional fora, typically held every 2-3 years;

Between fora, working groups, task forces and networks focus on selected developmental issues. 

These activities are carried out by groups of volunteers from existing organisations (from both developing and industrialised countries) with an interest in finding ways to resolve the issues. Each global forum provides the platform for consensus building on recommendations emanating from such activities. Emerging issues and appropriate policy/strategy regimes for the future are also discussed. 

 

The World Water Assessment Programme

 

Local Authorities

International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI)

http://www.iclei.org 
ICLEI is the international environmental agency for local governments. ICLEI's mission is to build and serve a worldwide movement of local governments to achieve tangible improvements in global environmental and sustainable development conditions through cumulative local actions. Building a worldwide movement requires that ICLEI functions as a democratic, international association of local governments. Serving a worldwide movement requires that ICLEI operates as an international environmental agency for local governments.
More than 350 cities, towns, counties, and their associations from around the world are full Members of the Council, with hundreds of additional local governments participating in specific ICLEI campaigns and projects. As a movement, association, and agency, ICLEI continues to work towards its environmental and sustainable development goals. Significant improvements in the freshwater and sanitation sector form a major part of achieving these goals.

 

Multi – Stakeholder Organisations

International Rivers Network
 http://www.irn.org/index.html   
IRN supports local communities working to protect their rivers and watersheds. The organisation works to halt destructive river development projects, and to encourage equitable and sustainable methods of meeting needs for water, energy and flood management.
IRN seeks a world in which rivers and their watersheds are valued as living systems and are protected and nurtured for the benefit of the human and biological communities that depend on them. This vision can be achieved by developing worldwide understanding of the importance of rivers and their essential place in the struggle for environmental integrity, social justice, and human rights.
IRN's mission is to halt and reverse the degradation of river systems; to support local communities in protecting and restoring the well-being of the people, cultures and ecosystems that depend on rivers; to promote sustainable, environmentally sound alternatives to damming and channeling rivers; to foster greater understanding, awareness and respect for rivers; to support the
 http://www.irn.org/index.html   
IRN supports local communities working to protect their rivers and watersheds. The organisation works to halt destructive river development projects, and to encourage equitable and sustainable methods of meeting needs for water, energy and flood management.
IRN seeks a world in which rivers and their watersheds are valued as living systems and are protected and nurtured for the benefit of the human and biological communities that depend on them. This vision can be achieved by developing worldwide understanding of the importance of rivers and their essential place in the struggle for environmental integrity, social justice, and human rights.
IRN's mission is to halt and reverse the degradation of river systems; to support local communities in protecting and restoring the well-being of the people, cultures and ecosystems that depend on rivers; to promote sustainable, environmentally sound alternatives to damming and channeling rivers; to foster greater understanding, awareness and respect for rivers; to support the worldwide struggle for environmental integrity, social justice and human rights; and to ensure that our work is exemplary of responsible and effective global action on environmental issues.

IRN has adopted a two-pronged approach, combining work on changing global policies with campaigning on specific key projects around the world. We do this because we understand that effective lobbying for policy change must include specific project examples, and that fighting successive individual projects without addressing root causes is not an efficient use of our resources nor will it decelerate the pace of destructive project construction.  

Global Water Partnership
http://www.gwpforum.org/  
The Global Water Partnership is a working partnership among all those involved in water management: government agencies, public institutions, private companies, professional organizations, multilateral development agencies and others committed to the Dublin-Rio principles.
Today, this comprehensive partnership identifies critical knowledge needs at global, regional and national levels, helps design programs for meeting these needs, and serves as a mechanism for alliance building and information exchange on integrated water resources management.
The mission of the Global Water Partnership is to
"support countries in the sustainable management of their water resources."

 

Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs)

International Development Enterprises
http://www.ide-international.org/  
Since 1981, IDE has been active in providing the “right help” to the rural poor through affordable technology. The production and marketing of small-scale irrigation technologies has contributed to an increase in income of not only farmers, but also the masnufacturers, distributers and technicians that help disseminate these technologies. This happens through the free market, and IDE contributes only to the development of the technology and its widespread marketing promotion.

ECO-Accord
http://www.ecoaccord.cis.lead.org   
Eco-Accord is a non-governmental, non-profit organisation, founded in 1992 to promote the realisation of the decisions adopted at the UN conference on Environment and Development at the Rio conference in 1992.
It aims to find solutions to environmental and sustainable development problems both on the global and the national level, to raise public awareness on environmental and sustainable development issues, to facilitate information exchange and develop partnerships between NGOs, governmental, business, academic and other sectors of society.

WaterAid
http://www.wateraid.org.uk   
WaterAid works in fifteen countries in Africa and Asia with a wide variety of cultures and communities. WaterAid is a unique charity. It is the only one in the UK to specialise in just three things: water, sanitation and hygiene education. These three aspects of development can be the catalyst to a completely improved life. WaterAid provides the financial support and technical advice to communities overseas to help them work towards practical solutions to their water and sanitation problems. 
WaterAid believes that once people have safe water to drink, effective sanitation and knowledge of good health practices they are able to take control of their lives. They can then construct good housing, have time to go to school, grow extra food for their families and undertake other activities to generate income. WaterAid believes that safe water means healthier lives and better futures.

Environmental Monitoring Group
http://home.global.co.za/~emg/  
Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) is an independent non-governmental organisation established in June 1991, and located in Cape Town, South Africa. Its primary role is to assist communities and interest groups to assert their environmental rights in policy and decision-making and in cases of environmental injustice. We see our role as one of 'building a bridge' between decision-makers and those who are most affected by these decisions. This role translates into a number of key activities, including: brokering, capacity building, research, information dissemination, communication, policy input, forging partnerships and networking.

Their mission is to empower people to take charge of their own environment, so that the right to a healthy environment can be enjoyed by all. 

Watershed Organisation Trust (WOTR)
http://www.wotr.org   
The Watershed Organisation Trust (WOTR) is a development support team of professionals, having core competency, committed to motivating and facilitating, rural communities and NGOs, towards sustainable, integrated watershed development with the help of local and external resources.
The aim of WOTR is to support village communities in eradicating their poverty by regenerating their environment along watershed lines. To achieve this objective, WOTR, together with its partners, seeks to mobilize the creative potential of the watershed dwellers so that they come together to regenerate their environment, in a comprehensive and integrated manner. WOTR also seeks to assist NGOs through capacity-building. In order to ensure a large scale impact and replication effort, WOTR seeks to facilitate the unfolding of a people's movement for natural resources management along watershed lines. 

Institute for Agriculture & Trade Policy
http://www.iatp.org/  
The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy promotes resilient family farms, rural communities and ecosystems around the world through research and education, science and technology, and advocacy.
The Institute assists public interest organizations in effectively influencing both domestic and international policymaking through monitoring, analysis and research; education and outreach; training and technical assistance; coalition building and international networking.
IATP run a website called the Water Observatory, ‘a site dedicated to providing information and resources to citizens, policy makers, the media, activist and movements working locally and globally on the right to water’.

 

Professional Associations

International Water Association (IWA)
http://www.iawq.org.uk
The International Water Association (IWA) is to be the leading international membership association for the improvement of urban water management worldwide in an environmentally sustainable way. Specifically, IWA's coverage includes all aspects of water supply and treatment, wastewater collection, treatment and disposal and overall management of water quality and quantity including environmental and public health issues.
IWA’ mission is to achieve its vision by promoting best practice and exchange of the latest skills, techniques and knowledge on these aspects of water management. Then IWA disseminates this worldwide by all possible means including meetings, publications, expert networks and electronic media. Also, IWA engages in advocacy and exchange of ideas with major agencies and the promotion of public awareness.  And, IWA provides a means whereby all the different types of organisations and professions in the water sector can exchange information.

 

Scientific Communities

World Conservation Union (IUCN)
http://www.iucn.org  
The World Conservation Union (IUCN) brings together 78 states, 112 government agencies, 735 NGOs, 35 affiliates, and some 10,000 scientists and experts from 181 countries in a unique worldwide partnership. Its mission is to influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve the integrity and diversity of nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable. Within the framework of global conventions IUCN has helped over 75 countries to prepare and implement national conservation and biodiversity strategies. IUCN has approximately 1000 staff, most of whom are located in its 42 regional and country offices while 100 work at its Headquarters in Gland, Switzerland.

 

Trade Unions

International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU)
http://www.icftu.org  
The International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU) was set up in 1949 and has 225 affiliated organisations in 148 countries and territories on all five continents, with a membership of 157 million. It has three major regional organisations, APRO for Asia and the Pacific, AFRO for Africa, and ORIT for the Americas. It also maintains close links with the European Trade Union Confederation (which includes all ICFTU European affiliates) and International Trade Secretariats, which link together national unions from a particular trade or industry at international level.
The ICFTU organises and directs campaigns on a wide range of issues, including defending worker’s rights, eradicating child labour, equal rights for women, the environment, education programmes, organising young people and investigating trade union networks worldwide. This is a very strong organisation capable of making a significant contribution towards the problems associated with freshwater and sanitation worldwide.

Public Sector International
www.world-psi.org 
Public Services International (PSI) is an international trade union federation. PSI, unites public sector workers in more than 600 trade unions in over 140 countries. Twenty million women and men in a variety of public sector jobs are members of PSI.
For more than 90 years, PSI has fought for public services through its activities and campaigns, its regional structure, its association with other international organisations and its work on priority issues
. Public Services International considers that the environment is a priority public service workplace issue. With clean air, a clean and regular water supply, clean streets, untainted food, healthy housing and good sewage, running as high priorities within this organisation.

 

Women

Gender and Water Alliance
http://www.irc.nl/projects/genall/
  
The Gender and Water Alliance (GWA) is an associated programme of the Global Water Partnership. The purpose of this programme is to promote strategic improvements in the practice of gender mainstreaming, through a network of organisations committed to and active in mainstreaming gender in their own work and that of their partners. This will contribute to the goal, which is to achieve effective policies and practice on gender mainstreaming in integrated water resources management. It comprises 110 members from 39 countries in seven regions of the world. 
Active Gender Ambassadors, an annual global report on Water and Gender, improving access, consolidation, repackaging and dissemination of quality information, best practices and training materials are among the key actions of the alliance. The project is co-funded by DFID from the United Kingdom and DGIS from the Netherlands.

The Huairou Commission

http://www.huairou.org  
“Forging strategic partnerships to advance the capacity of grassroots women worldwide to strengthen and create sustainable communities”, is the mission statement of the Huairou Commission. The commission’s objectives are to promote the institutional transformation needed to engender local community development and governance; To strengthen the capacity, resource position, and collaboration of local women's organizations and their affiliated regional and global networks; and to increase grassroots women's participation in the decision-making processes impacting their lives with a special focus on political participation.

 

Youth

Youth World Water Forum
http://www.ywwf.net  
The Youth Water Action Team aims to further develop the youth commitment in water conferences, and form a basis for a youth network on raising awareness on water issues, by organizing local projects. Their major achievements to date include work during the Youth World Water Forum (YWWF) in Vlissingen (the Netherlands) from 25 to 28 June 2001, where about 200 young professionals discussed world water issues to put on the international agenda for the decades to come. The basis for this event are the Youth Action Plan (YAP) and the Youth Vision Statement, which were drawn up by young people at the Second World Water Forum (WWF2). In order to allow the voice of the youth to be heard at international meetings, it is very important to give structure and continuity to the execution of the YAP. To guarantee this continuity, a task force was formed out of the YWWF participants. The members of this group will be the ambassadors of the YAP execution process in their own region. This task force is called the Youth Water Action Team (YWAT).

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