Earth Summit 2002   Ecoagriculture

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ACTION PLAN:

Ecoagriculture

 

Vision:

To promote the profile and use of Ecoagriculture, currently defined as “sustainable and associated natural resource management that embraces and simultaneously enhances productivity, rural livelihoods, ecosystem services and biodiversity, by catalysing:

Research and land-use innovation with farmers and conservationists

Capacity building

Education and public awareness

Enabling policies

Resource mobilization

 

Proposed Outcomes

Raise the profile and adoption of land use systems that increase agricultural productivity, ecosystem services and biodiversity

Establish criteria for project measurement and qualification

Identify policy bottlenecks and recommend policy frameworks to facilitate the scaling up of Ecoagriculture use

Mobilize the necessary resources to support the implementation of such land management systems

 

Work Programme (Summary)

Specific targets of the Partnership/Initiative and timeframe for their achievement:

October 2002: Establish an interim secretariat at the Future Harvest Foundation

Early 2003: Conference and partnership planning meeting (professionally facilitated) 

Late 2003 / Early 2004: International experts conference on Ecoagriculture Research and Policy

 

Ongoing:

Create a multi-stakeholder coalition mandated to implementing their mutually agreed action plan, roles and responsibilities

Creation of an educational, capacity building and outreach component

Mobilize support for on the ground projects and communities

Identify and publicize model communities

 

Key work programme foci (See Annex 1 below for further details):

Development of the partnership

Partner Planning Workshop

International Conference: Late 2003/Early 2004

‘On the ground’

Support to ongoing Ecoagriculture projects and participant communities

Identify and publicize model communities

Education and Capacity Building

Media and Public Awareness

 

Partner organizations:

Intergovernmental Organizations: IUCN, IFAD, FAO, UNEP, UNDP – Equator Initiative (Expression of Interest)

Research Organizations: James Cook University – Australia, University of North Carolina - Carolina Population Center, Future Harvest Centres: CIAT, IWMI, CIFOR, ICRAF, ILRI (others to be contacted), Forest Trends, CABI Bioscience, Bionet International

NGOs: Future Harvest Foundation, The Nature Conservancy, International Environment Forum, South African Human Rights Commission

Science: International Council for Science (ICSU)

Trade Unions: International Federation of Agricultural Producers (IFAP)

Governments: (possibly create a committee of national sponsors) United States of America (USDA, USAID), Canada, Mexico, The Netherlands, Belgium

Community Organizations: Selected Equator Initiative finalists, Future Harvest Center Community Partners, Transkei Land Service Organization

Other: Stakeholder Forum for Our Common Future

 

ANNEX 1: ECOAGRICULTURE WORK PROGRAMME – FURTHER DETAILS

 

1. PARTNERSHIP

DEVELOPMENT

 PROCESS:

Actively seek and engage additional partners

Explore creation of an ‘ecoagriculture committee’

Encourage further engagement of scientists

  

All

 

IFAP and IUCN

 

2. PARTNER PLANNING WORKSHOP 

AIM:

Initial meeting, possibly with selected invitees from field projects

(potential candidates for ‘On the Ground I”).

PROCESS: PLANNINND AND LOGISTICS

Early 2003

25-40 people

1-2 days

Follow-up half-day meeting of core planners for the international conference.

Venue: Europe or Mexico (tentative)

 

Secretariat  

(Future Harvest Foundation)

 

3. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

AIMS:

To draw wider attention to ecoagriculture

To bring together experts[1] on ecoagriculture from around the world to

assess the current state of     ecoagriculture

develop a strategy for moving forward.

 

AGENDA:

Ambitious, multi-stranded, to encompass abroad spectrum of ecoagriculture elements, including:

Examine existing research and technology

Review of ‘on the ground’ examples

Identification of needs for new technology

Marketing and certification issues

Education

Socio-economics impacts

Social, organizational, institutional research

Transfer of technology

Management of estuaries and coastal resources (possibly)

 

INTENDED OUTPUTS: 

Action plans, to include

An information strategy

Alternative models for ecoagricuture promotion in the field including synthesis and transfer of information to communities

US small farmers grant model;

FAO farmer field schools

Cooperative mechanisms, for example watershed planning and community cooperation

PROCESS: PLANNING AND LOGISTICS

 

Date: Late 2003 / Early 2004

 

Venue pre-requisites:

In a developing country

Within the proximity of excellent ecoagriculture examples for field visits.

Possibly near a Future Harvest Center – for help with support and logistics.

 

Duration: 1 week, with an interim one-day field trip (plus other optional field visits before and after the conference).

 

Format:

Professionally facilitated (possibly)

Possibly preceded by regional mini-conferences

Linked if feasible, with important international agency action (e.g., FAO) and international meetings, such as the September 2003 Parks and Protected Areas Congress

Aimed at facilitating learning, application and synthesis

 

Fundraising for:

Organizational costs

Sponsorship for developing country participants

 

 

 

 

4. ‘ON THE GROUND I’:

SUPPORT TO ONGOING ECOAGRICULTURE PROJECTS & COMMUNITIES

AIMS:

Identify and develop and index of existing research, conservation, agricultural development projects, with associated organizations. 

The set of projects should be highly diversified, in terms of: market & non-market-oriented; ecoregions; types of farming systems; large/small-scale farmers

Key project foci:

“Hotspots” for biodiversity or for ecological degradation.

Projects that demonstrate the value of considering biodiversity to farmers.

Projects related to long-term benchmark studies, for example Olifant basin, Mekong Delta,  Sri Lanka, to benefit from research information and institutions.

Potential project support to include filling in gaps, such as biodiversity assessment or economic assessment. 

‘Adoption’ of a model project, adding missing elements, strengthening the projects, and providing linkages with useful organizations

Partnership to also consider developing their own case studies

 PROCESS:

Identify potential projects

Consult with project people at planning meeting regarding needs identification

Structure conference activities to enable the provision of feedback to them whilst providing others with an opportunity to learn from them

Identify and approach a group of foundations willing to fund a small grants program to assist these existing projects – although in the long term, ecoagriculture must be able to be successful without outside, grant funding.

 

 

5. ON THE GROUND II:

IDENTIFY & PUBLICIZE MODEL COMMUNITIES

AIMS:

Identify, publicize and share information and best practice examples, including

vulnerable areas that have avoided degradation

communities that are doing a good job

Subsistence farmers who are not well-linked but are doing this work for their own reasons;

Communities that have attracted recent migrants.

Develop criteria for qualifications, regarding agricultural systems and practices.

Highlight the work of some projects at the Conference, to serve as a focal point for discussion and learning.

 

PROCESS:

Identify

Document

Study

Disseminate information and learnings

 

6. EDUCATION AND CAPACITY-BUILDING

AIMS:

Possible collaborative activities include:

Development of Ecoagriculture modules for training courses. Partners could provide curriculum.

Identify appropriate training courses in which to use modules

Work with farmers’ groups; schools and educators (farmer field school as model?)

Catalyse the development of practitioner handbooks for different ecosystems

Develop curricular materials for diverse levels

Create videos of successful efforts

Document cases on website

 

 

 

James Cook University, IPGRI, ILRI, SANREM, ICRAF.

7.     MEDIA AND PUBLIC AWARENESS

AIMS:

Develop packageable messages for delivery through:

Radio as a key medium, esp. in light of unaffordable printed media

Agricultural Media Professionals (AMPs) - education through dissemination of information and best practices

Include AMPs in regional workshops and the international conference , with provision of tool kits, press releases etc.

Develop an ecoagriculture photo library

Address and organize outreach to governments.

  

PROCESS:

 

Develop Information Packet to:

Provide clarity to partners

Introduce partnership to others

Interest donors

Distribute at conferences, etc.

 

Proposed content:

Interim ecoagriculture definition, vision statement and mission statement, emphasizing

Combating hunger

Participatory

Knowledge brokering

Preliminary list of partners

Projected activities with tentative dates

Bibliography

Photographs of ecoagriculture in practice

Current state of ecoagriculture around the world: What’s new, what’s been done and building on that etc/

Connection to Agenda 21, Chap 14; CBD, IUCN, Millennium Goals, agrobiodiversity definition

Geographical, Ecological and Social Statement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link with AMP Task Force

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Experts to include farmers and field conservationists, as well as scientists and policy analysts. The group should include participants from South America, Asia, faith-based NGOs, Agricultural Media Professionals etc. 

 

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