Earth Summit 2002   Solar Best Practice

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ACTION PLAN:

Solar Best Practice

The participants at this workshop discussed solar best practice and their experiences.  Two programs were discussed in particular:  A Global Solar Cooker Programme, focusing on the promotion and raising awareness of best practice solar cooking and ; The Barefoot Solar Programme in India, which focuses on providing solar lighting for communities, with active participation and training of the solar technology by the community.  For more information on this programme you can access through the Barefoot Solar Solution Website.

What evolved from the workshop was a proposal for a Global Solar Cooker Programme.  Since then, and in addition to this, the champion Hazel Brown of the Network of NGOs for Trinidad and Tobago, has pulled together  a preliminary proposal specifically for the Caribbean region.  Both proposals are enclosed below.

 

 

PROPOSAL 1:  A GLOBAL SOLAR COOKER PROGRAMME

 

INTRODUCTION

Most of the world depends on biomass to fulfil its domestic energy needs. As the worlds’ population increases, so the worlds’ biomass resources dwindle, environmental degradation follows rapidly.  Security of domestic energy supply has become one of the most critical issues to be addressed in developing countries. This shortage exacerbates CO 2 emissions.

The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) provides an opportunity for the sustainable financing of any solution that can be found for this problem. What has been lacking thus far is potentially viable solutions.

 

SOLAR COOKING:  A POTENTIAL SOLUTION

For some time now, solar cooking has been proposed as a potential solution.  In optimum cases, solar cooking can significantly reduce the use of wood or biomass and all of the associated negative effects.  Solar cookers have the potential to effect up to 800 million tons of CO2 savings annually, at a very favourable price of between Euro2 and Euro5 per ton mitigated.

Although efforts to introduce solar cookers have been fragmented in the past, they have nevertheless recently overcome most of the technical supply side barriers that have inhibited the wide-scale introduction of this technology, such as poor performance and safety characteristics.  Solar cooking is now poised, worldwide, to deliver significant benefits to both the environment and the quality of life for millions. for people of all ages.

The introduction of a world wide solar cooker programme, implemented through a network of local and regional actors, has the potential to significantly:

mitigate CO2 emissions;

reduce local environmental degradation;

improve health;

stimulate economic activity; and.

Promote gender equity

Promote equitable access to energy

Poverty alleviation

 

A COLLABORATIVE ACTION PLAN

At the Implementation Conference, convened during the preparations of the WSSD, a number of individual and institutional initiatives from five regions of the world, came together and agreed to collaborate on “a three years pilot project” which will take solar cooking from its current status as a good idea, into the realm of world wide reality.

Since women are often the primary users of fuels and energy consuming appliances, their participation in the development of this solution is essential. 

In order for this to happen, the very concept of solar cooking needs to be massively popularised, in order to create a market that is large enough for production at a level that achieves the economies of scale necessary to make the product affordable to those who most need them.

The private sector must be an essential component in this regard.  Although a measure of private sector involvement exists, it is limited and based largely on goodwill.  The challenge now is to turn that into sustained active involvement, harnessing the forces that drive economies, through the integral involvement of the private sector to deliver on a development agenda.  In this process, care should be taken not to distort markets through subsidization of recurrent production costs or of the final price of the product while at the same time ensuring special consideration is given to particular situations and emergency situation.

The Solar Cooker Group at the IC brings together considerable expertise, research and experience in the field of solar cooking.  Through a collaborative effort, on a scale hitherto unprecedented, this group believes  that the above can be achieved.  To this end the group is putting forward a proposal that seeks to address the three main issues hindering progress in this sector; outreach, impact and sustainability.

 

The group proposes the following process:

Building local capacity to provide the local services.

Stimulating local markets to create a demand, which through cumulative efforts in the regions already involved and in others in which the idea can be promoted, will become a worldwide demand.  This can be achieved by:

networking among and capacity building of project drivers;

community mobilization;

promoting awareness of the benefits of solar cooking; and

facilitating affordability of product through mechanisms such as micro financing, trade in facilities for upgrading, etc.

Encouraging the involvement of the private sector through minimizing the risks presently associated with entry into this sector by:

ensuring the availability of cheap production inputs;

ensuring the availability of affordable credit access;

facilitating relief on duties and taxes;

supporting product development to ensure consumer satisfaction;

supporting product development to meet the requirements of mass-production; and

providing specialist advisory services to ensure that private sector is based on sound development principles and viable business plans.

Ensuring tight performance monitoring and demonstration of impact, at local, national and global level,

Documenting of experiences

 

The group is proposing a pilot project over a three-year period (beginning 2003 – end 2005).  The overall project period should span fifteen years, in order to ensure worldwide implementation.  The intention is to include all countries with a capacity to develop and implement local solutions that reach many people.   A start fund would be required only in order to initiate the process and support its global implementation over the fifteen-year period.  Access to resources would be contingent on the submission of locally developed plans that conform to broad programme criteria.   Payment would  be performance related  on the basis of effective impact demonstrated.  Overall programme management and control would be put out to transparent process.  There would be participating project involvement at the governance level.

 

ENSURING LONGTERM SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH THE CDM

This is a major, worldwide programme, with long-term implications.  Its success ultimately will be judged by the continuation of its impact beyond the parameters of the programme.  Thus, a financing mechanism must be found that will support the initiative into the future.  The Clean Development Mechanism provides the opportunity for such a financing mechanism.  The CDM will make it possible to provide an ongoing incentive to the private sector to produce affordable products.

The impetus created by this programme and support of the CDM framework, should sustain the initiative indefinitely.

 

PROJECT PLANNING MATRIX

Overall Goal: Solar cookers make a noticeable contribution to sustainable development and poverty alleviation.

Development Goal: The  Developing World’s dependence on biomass is significantly reduced.

Project Purpose:  A global market for solar cookers has been firmly established and local community capacity is developed in relation to sustainable development goals.

Results:

1. CDM has been successfully exploited for solar cookers.

2. Solar cooking is commonly known and understood as a viable option for cooking.

3. Solar cookers that satisfy consumers’ needs (price and performance) are widely available.

4. Capacity of a global network of solar cooker partners established.

5. Demonstrate and document the development impacts of this project.

 

BUDGET REQUIREMENT:

The budget requirement is estimated for the expenses in setting up the Global Network for Solar Cookers, the introduction of 5,000,000 solar cookers, and the promotion in four regions, and monitoring and evaluation. 

Budget line items

Amount in US$

1. Establishment of CDM Support

500,000

2. Promotion and Training for solar cookers in four regions

12,000,000

3. Introduction of 5,000,000 cookers

25,000,000

4. Global Network Administration

1,500,000

5. Monitoring, Evaluation and Documentation

1,000,000

Total:

40,000,000

 

Global Solar Cooker Collaborations

Stakeholder Forum

24-26 August 2002

 

Collaborating Partners are:

Stakeholder Forum (UK)

Solar Cooker Commercialisation Project, GTZ (South Africa)

Sunstove Organization (South Africa and USA)

Energy Technology Laboratory (UPT LSDE), Agency For the Assessment and Application of Technology.(Indonesia)

Network of Non Government Organization of Trinidad and Tobago for the Advancement of Women

Energia (Philippines)

Joaquim Nabuco Foundation (Brazil) 

 

 

PRELIMINARY PROPOSAL 2: SOLAR COOKER PROJECT FOR THE CARIBBEAN REGION 

Project Title: Solar Cooker Manufacturing and Training of Community Leaders/Trainers Project

Executing Agency: The Network of NGOs of Trinidad and Tobago for the Advancement of Women, 5B Bergerac Road, MARAVAL, Trinidad and Tobago, Tel/Fax (868) 628-9655

Contact Person: Ms Hazel Brown, Coordinator

Summary: A project for the Manufacture of Solar Cookers including the training of Women Community leaders/trainers, Girl Guides and Boy Scouts leaders how to make and use Solar Cookers.

Duration: November 2002- October 2003

Funding request: Approx  $TT 250,000

 

PROJECT SUMMARY

Agenda 21, the environmental action plan adopted at the UN environment Conference held in Rio, sets out measures for achieving sustainable development. Chapter four deals with the provision of renewable energy in poverty alleviation, providing for human security and protecting the earth’s atmosphere.

Capturing the energy of the sun for cooking can have a profound impact on this most universal daily activity, particularly for women. Solar cooking is a practical, convenient way for people of all ages to use a safe, non-polluting energy source. There are also health benefits. The gentle temperatures of a solar box are ideal to cook food without burning and destruction of important nutrients. The outcomes are healthy and enjoyable. Solar cookers can also be used to purify water and sterilize instrument in situations of emergencies.

The Network, has over the past fifteen years, engaged in projects which are geared towards expanding women’s consciousness for action, the alleviation of poverty and the promotion of sustainable livelihoods.  Among projects executed by The Network are, “Promoting Healthy Lifestyle for Women”, “The Women’s Sewing Project”, and “Second-hand School Books Exchange”, ‘Engendering Local Government’ and the ‘Gender Media Monitor’.

Since 1991 the Network introduced to the NGO community the concept of solar cooking utilising a renewable energy source.  The demonstrations in how to make and use the solar cooker were taken to communities and schools all over Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, and most recently South Africa.

At the IC, convened during the preparations of the WSSD, in South Africa, in August 2002, a number of individual and institutional initiatives from five regions of the world, came together and agreed to collaborate on “a three years pilot project” which will take solar cooking from its current status as a good idea, into the realm of world wide reality.

Since women are often the primary users of fuels and energy consuming appliances, their participation in the development of this solution is essential.  In order for this to happen, the very concept of solar cooking needs to be massively popularised, in order to create a market that is large enough for production at a level that achieves the economies of scale necessary to make the product affordable to those who most need them.

The benefits to be derived from the use of the solar cooker can be stated as follows;

Health

food cooked at low temperature preserving the valuable nutrients

sterilisation of water and medical instruments

Economic

savings on fuel

creation of income earning opportunities for women to manufacture solar ovens

Environmental

Preservation of the environment

Partnerships with community, state and business organisations

 

OVERALL DEVELOPMENTAL OBJECTIVE

The overall developmental objective of the project is to encourage the use of a cost-effective, easily available alternate energy source, which is also environmentally friendly and not harmful to human health while creating income earning opportunities and sustainable livelihoods in communities.         

 

PROJECT OBJECTIVES

To create a sustainable production unit for the South African model of SUNSTOVE for use and sale in Trinidad and Tobago and the Caribbean including Haiti.

To create a cadre of Solar Cooker Leaders and promoters, who will be able to share their knowledge and skills with other members of their community or organisation locally and in the Caribbean

To empower women and communities through skills training in the production and use of solar cookers.

 

PROJECT BENEFICIARIES

The beneficiaries of this project would be women and community leaders in three areas (1 rural and two urban suburbs), Girl Guides and Scouts leaders.

 

JUSTIFICATION

Fulfilling basic human needs and improving the quality of life are the main objectives of any development process. These objectives must be understood as the capacity to achieve social and economic growth in an environmentally sustainable manner, based on a long-term perspective in order not to jeopardize the interest of future generations.

The purpose of introducing this form of cooking is an attempt to expose people in general, but women and children in particular to an alternative, renewable source of energy.  It is also hoped that this method of cooking could contribute to the strategies used for the eradication of poverty, and building awareness of the need to protect, conserve and preserve environment.

Today more attention is being paid to sustainable development, the degradation of the environment.  The use of solar cookers could greatly contribute to protection of the environment. This Solar Cooker Project involves the promotion of a low cost, environmentally safe technology using a renewable energy source, which is freely available for 9 out of 10 days in the Caribbean.  Locally, there are many areas with pockets of poor people who can benefit from the introduction and availability of solar cooking.  Since the “fuel” is free and renewable, it is affordable to those of lesser means

The World Solar Summit held in Zimbabwe in 1996 conceived a concrete follow-up to the Rio Earth Summit. The Harare Declaration on Solar Energy and Sustainable Development and the World Solar Energy Programme 1996-2005 laid the foundations for the effective utilization of renewable, environmentally friendly energies, as major contributions to sustainable development. This is a joint responsibility of governments, and civil society.

Commitment One of the WSP states as follows: ‘We commit to work towards the wider use of solar energy to enhance the economic and social development of all people…

The successful implementation during the period covered by the programme of the renewable energy projects like this one will be an important contribution to the global strategy towards sustainable development and the ultimate goal on the pursuit of equality peace and justice in the world.

An aim of the project is the training of women community leaders along side young adults, male and female in an intergenerational learning process. The project also provides for training is participatory research and analysis by the women community leaders regarding attitudes and knowledge of people in their communities regarding solar cookers.  The area selected is one, which could benefit from the economic and poverty eradication aspects of the project.

Groups such as the Girl Guides and Scouts, who operate, to a large extent, under natural conditions, could benefit from training in the use of solar cooking. The necessary procedures will be developed for a Merit Badge to be awarded to the Guides and the Scouts for successful participation/demonstration of solar cookery. The project demonstrates another aspect of the partnership between Network members on matters such as the awareness and advocacy on the environment.

 

PROSPECTS FOR SUCCESS

The Network has had a good record of success in its projects because they are designed through a participatory process with the relevant stakeholders. The Solar Cooker workshops have always been well attended and there is a waiting list of persons who have heard about it and want to know more.

We have also had requests from other Caribbean countries for assistance with introducing the cookers. This effort has so far been hampered by the availability if persons with sufficient knowledge and skills to train others.

The girl guide and scout movements have shown great enthusiasm regarding the creation of the badges and they have already put the necessary structures in place for its establishment.

The areas selected for the community training are part of another Network project engaged in Women’s Community leadership. The possibility for creating an income generating activity for women in these areas is also a strong motivating factor for the participants.

 

PROJECT /PROGRAM INNOVATION

Over the years the Network has also been experimenting with various designs of solar cookers with a view to finding one most suitable for use in the Caribbean, as well as one which was relatively easy to manufacture, efficient and cost effective.

On a visit to South Africa we were introduced to this Sunstove cooker and we have been offered the use of the patent for its production in the Caribbean without charge. See brochure attached. The skills required for its manufacture are easily developed and can be done by women.

The project involves the development of a feasibility study for the production of this sturdy efficient solar cooker for sale. This can provide some long-term economic benefits in the form of income for the group of women entrepreneurs who will undertake the commercial production of the units for sale in Trinidad and Tobago and other parts of the region. It will also bring as well fuel cost savings for the users.

The development of the girl guide and boy-scout merit badge for solar cooking will be a first for the Caribbean.

 

WORLD SOLAR COOKER PROGRAMME - A COLLABORATIVE ACTION PLAN

At the Implementation Conference, convened during the preparations of the WSSD, in Johannesburg, South Africa, in August 2002, a number of individual and institutional initiatives from five regions of the world, came together and agreed to collaborate on “a three years pilot project” which will take solar cooking from its current status as a good idea, into the realm of world wide reality.

Since women are often the primary users of fuels and energy consuming appliances, their participation in the development of this solution is essential. 

In order for this to happen, the very concept of solar cooking needs to be massively popularised, in order to create a market that is large enough for production at a level that achieves the economies of scale necessary to make the product affordable to those who most need them.

The private sector must be an essential component in this regard.  Although a measure of private sector involvement exists, it is limited and based largely on goodwill.  The challenge now is to turn that into sustained active involvement, harnessing the forces that drive economies, through the integral involvement of the private sector to deliver on a development agenda.  In this process, care should be taken not to distort markets through subsidization of recurrent production costs or of the final price of the product while at the same time ensuring special consideration is given to particular situations and emergency situation.

The Solar Cooker Group at the Stakeholder Forum brings together considerable expertise, research and experience in the field of solar cooking.  Through a collaborative effort, on a scale hitherto unprecedented, this group believes that the above can be achieved.  To this end the group is putting forward a proposal that seeks to address the three main issues hindering progress in this sector; outreach, impact and sustainability.  (See proposal attached).

This project is now part of a major, worldwide programme, with long term implications.  Its success ultimately will be judged by the continuation of its impact beyond the parameters of the programme.  At the global level the Clean Development Mechanism has been identified as a possible financing mechanism.  The CDM will make it possible to provide an ongoing incentive to the private sector to produce affordable products. The impetus created by this World Solar Cooker programme and support of the CDM framework, should sustain the initiative indefinitely.

 

PROJECT METHODOLOGY

The approach that will be used in the project will be a gendered one, and one of inclusion.  Women, girls and boys will be participating alongside each other creating an intergenerational process.  Children and young adults will be learning from the elders and vice versa.

The actual knowledge, techniques and skills to be developed include

the principles of the solar cooking

practical skills in building the Solar cookers

teaching tools, simple survey methods

group problem-solving processes to adapt the cooker to varied cooking customs

The programme will be hands-on and action oriented. It will also be participatory. The leader/ trainers will be supported to go back to their community to share their knowledge and develop their skills. The research and analysis involved can be an empowering learning process, which  promotes  the development of critical understanding of social problems, their structural causes and possibilities for overcoming them.  Collective discussion and interaction are central to the participatory method.  People can only understand their situation by learning from their own and each other’s experiences. 

Inclusion of the Boy Scouts will bring a gender approach to the learning removing some of the stereotypical attitudes that  “cooking is women’s work”

The development of the Production Unit will involve a partnership with a state owned research and development company which has already offered support, and other private sector organisations who may  be willing to collaborate through Venture capital.

The  business plan will be finalised in collaboration with the stakeholders. The major components of the cooker will be recycled materials, which are available in Trinidad and Tobago.  Women and men in the selected community will be trained in the basic skills required for the construction of the cookers.

The marketing of the cookers will also involve partnership with people in the Diaspora.

 

PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE

A one-day introduction workshop for about 40 persons will be held in November 2002 at the Network Office.

Five women community leaders/promoters, 5 girl guide leaders and 5 scout leaders, chosen after the orientation workshop, will be trained in three further workshops in  December 2002 /January 2003, in how to make and use solar cookers.

A project facilitator will also be identified at the end of the training workshops.

The leader/promoters will return to their communities and groups to share their knowledge and skills in how to build and use a solar box cooker. They will convene at least four sessions (two per month),  in February/March 2003 for each of their communities or group. The project facilitator and the project coordinator will monitor these sessions.

The group leaders and facilitators will also meet on four occasions (twice per month,) to develop the business plan for the Solar Cooker Production Unit which will determine the final location(s) of the Production Unit.

The administrative and legal arrangements for the establishment of the production unit will be made in April  2003 and the physical infrastructure will be put in place to begin production in May 2003. 

Evaluation workshops will be held with all the participants in May & August 2003 following which a report will be submitted.

 

Budget

Item  TT$
Training Workshops for community leaders/promoters (4 workshops) 6,000
Stationery/Documentation 5,000
Building materials for 20 cookers (for  workshops) 1,000
Stipend for 3 community facilitators for six months (3 x$500x6) 9,000
Project Coordinator (12 months x $4000) 48,000
Administration/Secretarial services (1500x12)  18,000
Communications ( telephone/postage/ advertisements) 15,000
Workshop Building Infrastructure 50,000
Materials for construction of 1200 cookers  60,000
Tools and equipment  5,000
Wages for 6 months (4 workers @ $25 per cooker) 30,000
Professional fees 6,000
Evaluation and Report 1,000
Misc expenses 1,000
TOTAL 255,000

                                                                                

Sources of funding

Small Grants  230,000

Other partners  15,000

Network contribution  10,000

 

Submitted by: Hazel Brown, Coordinator

Current Status:  This proposal has been agreed and finalised and has been put forward for fundraising.

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